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Rise & Hang duffel bag transforms into a hanging set of shelves

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September 20, 2012

The Rise & Hang duffel bag

The Rise & Hang duffel bag

Image Gallery (6 images)

While traveling is generally a lot of fun, digging through your packed clothes to find a particular item can definitely be a hassle. The Rise & Hang duffel bag offers an alternative – it features built-in collapsible soft shelves that pull up out of it while it’s hanging in your hotel room closet, keeping your clothes organized and accessible.

To use the bag, you start by hanging it open in a closet (or wherever) at home, packing your clothes onto its shelves, then pushing the shelves/clothes down inside of it and zipping it up. Upon reaching your destination, you just open it back up, pull out the shelves, and hang it up. Your clothes will still be on the shelves where you packed them, so there won’t be any need to transfer them into the hotel room dresser.

Besides its three shelves (four, if you count its top surface), a nice added touch is a hamper compartment on the bottom, for storing your dirty laundry.

The Rise & Hang duffel bag has a capacity of 70.8 liters

The Rise & Hang duffel bag has a capacity of 70.8 liters, is water-resistant, and sells for US$69. For people who prefer to use a suitcase, a 42-liter luggage insert is also available for $44.

The bag can be seen in use in the video below.

Source: Rise & Hang via Dragon's Den

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
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4 Comments

Good Morning,

I recommend that this company make up some versions in Khaki-Tan, Olive Drab and black, all with off-white or very light green interior components and submit these to the US Army Soldier Support Ctr, Natick Labs. As a retired, long career Army Ordnance officer we are the branch that manages the acquisition process and as such we are always looking for bright ideas to ease a soldiers life while deployed.

This carrier, with some further improvements could be a very useful option for a soldier or marine in the field or in a field barracks setting either as an service-issued item or as a personally purchased optional item. I have a large butt pack, korea era issue, that I used to use very much in the manner shown by hanging or strapping it to tent poles.

StWils
21st September, 2012 @ 10:33 am PDT

This is a great idea- can you buy it in Australia. I would aim it at women who like to be neater and have it in carry on luggage diminsions.

Sandra Baxendell
21st September, 2012 @ 03:23 pm PDT

This certainly is an item that would be handy for many uses - but - $70.oo come on. The military would pay this because it is Taxpayer money and they could care less. It can be made for $5.oo or less minus the bag which can be gotten anywhere for a few dollars. I am not talking - made in China. It can be made here (U.S.) for that amount. Distribution, middle man, etc. $12.oo.

tigerprincess
4th June, 2013 @ 03:06 pm PDT

@tigerprincess thank you for your input. We actually tried to make the bags in Canada and they cost us $100 per bag! Unfortunately we couldn't stay competitive paying that much. The reason is that there is so much more material and labor in the shelving.

On another note, we have expanded our line to include rolling duffel bags to make it easier to get around with your stuff in an organized way! Check them out at www.risegear.com!

Lee - Found of Rise Gear

Lee Renshaw
17th July, 2014 @ 12:53 pm PDT
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