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Inventors and Remarkable People

— Inventors and Remarkable People

Charles Babbage: the brain that invented the computer

By - June 4, 2004 3 Pictures
Though Silicon Valley may be the heart of the commercialisation of all things digital, it is the British who can proudly boast having invented the computer. Indeed, so proud are the British of the work done by eccentric British mathematician and inventor Charles Babbage, that the Science Museum in London has subsequently built the machines he conceived and the Royal College of Surgeons has preserved his brain - the brain that invented the computer. Babbage proposed the first computer, a machine he called "the difference engine", in 1822 - it was the size of a house, could store a program, was powered by steam and could even print results. Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People

Australian Student wins International Award

By - June 4, 2004 9 Pictures
Australian Saul Griffith, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology doctoral candidate, has won the prestigious Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for inventing a machine which quickly tests vision and a desktop machine which manufactures low-cost eyeglass lenses. These machines could dramatically improve life for billions of people in developing countries who cannot access, nor afford, prescription glasses.” Merton Flemings, director of the Lemelson-MIT Program, which sponsors the annual award for inventiveness, cited Griffith’s innovative device eyeglass manufacturing and his work creating comic strips that inspire children to learn about science and engineering as important reasons he was chosen this year. Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People

The AcceleGlove - Capturing Hand Gestures in Virtual Reality

By - June 4, 2004 1 Picture
A glove that translates the hand movements of sign language into written text or speech is just one on the incredible benefits that will flow from developments in VR technology like the AcceleGlove.In constant development since the summer of 2000 the prototype uses a glove system that enables 'Whole Hand Input' using accelerometers attached to a leather glove. The latest design incorporates a two-link arm section to accommodate the recognition of a wider range of gestures.The system captures the four distinctive components of hand gestures -handshape, hand orientation, location, and movement - all measured relative to the position of the users' body. Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People

Rotational dining table

By - June 4, 2004 7 Pictures
One of the problems with sitting at a table full of interesting people is that you can only ever sit next to two of them at a time. It takes a disciplined and insistent host to make sure people keep moving "rotational dinner" style and in these times of fast dating and networking, it seems it's either finger food or wait until after dinner to meet all those people. Now there's a high-tech alternative designed with the vision of actively engaging fresh communication and alleviating all the physical and emotional barriers commonly associated through introductions. This revolutionary dining table from Contab moves you, your seat, and your food slowly around the its perimeter... so you get to meet everybody at the table several times during a two hour period. Watch the time-lapse video to see how this ingenious device works. Read More
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