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Inventors & Remarkable People

Mixaerator sterilises water without chemicals

November 3, 2004 Queensland inventor Mike Lewis has developed an impellor that uses the same principles as salmon, bath water and tornadoes, however his ground-breaking technology is revolutionising water sterilising and providing environmentally-friendly methods to clean up toxic damage. Mike's invention- Mixaerator- with the Twin Vortex Advantage (TVA) works using dual vortices, like the ones that occur when you pull the plug from the bath, or those found in the air currents of tornadoes. "Salmon use similar vortices to my machine. That's how they leap up water falls, their fins send out mini whirlpools that create immense force to push them up," Mike said.Read More

Photonics set to revolutionise the revolution

Just as the transistor and microelectronics transformed communications and human society in the 20th century, "light" transistors and microphotonics are about to revolutionise the way we communicate in the 21st century. We are on the verge of a new revolution in computing and communications thanks to the breakthrough advances by a Sydney based research team led by Professor Benjamin Eggleton. A Federation Fellow and Research Director of the CUDOS Centre for Ultra-high bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems, Professor Eggleton recently received the prestigious 2004 Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year for his pioneering work in the field of optical physics and photonics. Optical fibres carry gigabytes of data across oceans and to our streets, hospitals, schools and businesses.Read More

Australian science aids America's Cup Victory

When Swiss yacht Alinghi won the 2003 Americas cup from Team New Zealand, it wasn't just the result of a badly timed snapped mast or New Zealand sailors on the opposing side - behind the scenes Australian science played a critical role in providing accurate weather predictions for the Swiss teamRead More

The rise and rise of the Internet

Tim Berners-Lee took the disparate threads of the "Internet" and created the level playing field "World Wide Web", allowing browser based surfing of documents stored on servers all over the world for the first time...Read More

Digital Paper

Perhaps the most important invention in human history is about to take its greatest leap forward since the printing press - pen and paper are going digital.Read More

Creating the clean diesel engine

Ron Kukler has spent 30 years as a combustion engineer, before he had a specific need - he wanted a lightweight diesel engine for a high-speedboating application and available motors were too heavy, too noisy, too expensive, or vibrated too much... so he decided to create his ownRead More

Garry Kasparov takes game three against X3D Fritz

Garry Kasparov has bounced back from his loss on Friday to win game three against the awesome processing power of X3D Fritz. Kasparov played a "picture-perfect" game forcing the computer - which can see almost four million positions per second - to submit after five hours of play. The result ties the match with one decisive game to go, on Tuesday 11/18 at 1PM.Read More

Stephen Hawking chooses a new voice

Celebrated Astrophysicist Stephen Hawking has selected and is using NeoSpeech's Text-to-Speech engine, VoiceText, as his new voice. VoiceText is integrated into Dr. Hawking's communicator, E Z Keys, enabling him to clearly communicate with the outside world. Dr. Hawking has a computer screen mounted on the arm of his wheel chair, which runs communicator software. The software enables him to press a switch in his hand to create words and sentences easily and intuitively. Once he has built up a sentence, he sends it to NeoSpeech's VoiceText speech synthesizer, which turns it into speech. The technology enables Dr. Hawking to communicate, including writing scientific books and papers, and giving lectures.Read More

Australian Student wins International Award

Australian Saul Griffith, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology doctoral candidate, has won the prestigious Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for inventing a machine which quickly tests vision and a desktop machine which manufactures low-cost eyeglass lenses. These machines could dramatically improve life for billions of people in developing countries who cannot access, nor afford, prescription glasses.” Merton Flemings, director of the Lemelson-MIT Program, which sponsors the annual award for inventiveness, cited Griffith’s innovative device eyeglass manufacturing and his work creating comic strips that inspire children to learn about science and engineering as important reasons he was chosen this year.Read More

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