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Inventors and Remarkable People

Tiret New York's 26.5 carat diamond 'Second Chance' wristwatch

July 14, 2005 It must be the right month for outrageous diamond watches. A fortnight ago TAG Heuer trotted out Uma Therman wearing the red satin EU100,000 euro Diamond Fiction watch bracelet dripping with 879 Top Wesselton diamonds and now luxury watchmaker Tiret New York has designed its newest watch with 26.5ct of EXIRE diamonds from Belgian diamond manufacturer Inter Gems-Claes. New to the luxury watch scene, Tiret was launched in 2003 by Damon Dash and Daniel Lazar and has wasted little time in making itself very visible on the wrists of celebrities and sportspeople in the New York scene. Dash, Jay-Z and Biggs Burke formed Roc-A-Fella Records in 1996, and have created a juggernaut in rap music, clothing, liquor, publishing, film, and the hip-hop community in general since then. Thirty-two-year-old Dash is the business brains behind the Roc-A-Fella empire and has the connections and Midas Touch to seemingly make any brand successful right now. He appears to be doing just that with the Tiret name and the completely over-the-top “Second Chance” collection. With five times the carats of TAG Heuer’s Diamond Fiction, we weren’t game to ask the price.  Read More

Vale Jack Kilby: the inventor of the microchip dies

June 24, 2005 Jack Kilby, the man who invented the Integrated Circuit – also known as the microchip – died on Monday at age 81. It’s not every day that a man of Kilby’s importance passes away. In terms of the magnitude of his invention, Jack Kilby ranks with just a handful of people in history whose inventions have comprehensively changed the world – names such as Johannes Gutenberg, James Watt, Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison and Henry Ford come to mind, and even then the universal application of the microchip ranks it above all of those inventions. In times yet to come, Kilby’s invention will be even more significant as the microchip seems destined to become a part of nearly every manufactured object.  Read More

Bendable concrete

May 7, 2005 A new type of fibre-reinforced bendable concrete will be used for the first time in Michigan this summer. Developed by University of Michigan scientists, the new concrete looks like regular concrete, but is 500 times more resistant to cracking and 40 percent lighter in weight. Tiny fibres that comprise about 2 percent of the mixture's volume partly account for its performance. Also, the materials in the concrete itself are designed for maximum flexibility. Because of its long life, the Engineered Cement Composites (ECC) are expected to cost less in the long run, as well.  Read More

Inflatable composite structures enable lightweight transportable buildings

May 7, 2005 Inflatable structures (aka airbeams) have developed rapidly in recent times, finding application in a variety of new engineering projects ranging from military tents in Iraq and Afghanistan to antennas in outer space. With necessity as the driving force, a team of engineers at the U.S. Army Soldier Systems Center in Natick forms the backbone of research into the technology. And the results have been spectacular - the technology has reduced the transportable weight of a tent by 66%, the transportable volume by 75% and the setup time by 50%.  Read More

This waiting room chair can transform into a hospital bed

UPDATED (NEW IMAGES) April 26, 2005 This Intelligent Waiting Room Chair is a seat for hospital, school and nursing home waiting rooms that folds down into a fully functional hospital bed when required - ideal for emergency situations and for areas where disaster may strike, the bed is, according to the judges of the Australian Design Awards who gave it a silver medal, "clever, simple, commercially viable, and integrates well into current systems." Most importantly, it was designed by a recent graduate who is now seeking to take the product to market.  Read More

The Umbrella reinvented: the fully retractable umbrella

UPDATED April 26, 2005 (NEW IMAGES) Young designer Andy Wana has won the GOLD 2005 Australian Design Award-Dyson Student Award, by reengineering the humble umbrella, creating a significantly different take on the umbrella than anything seen before. Wana’s design overcomes several of the design weaknesses of the traditional umbrella. ‘Lotus 23’ is a fully retractable umbrella, folding into a low profile handle. Built with flexible ribs that flow with the wind, it is more durable than conventional designs allowing it to withstand severe storms, provide increased shade and self clean meaning that it squeezes the water off before you enter a building. It’s also cheaper to manufacture.  Read More

Happy Birthday to the newspaper - 400 and going strong

March 9, 2005 Mass media will celebrate its 400th birthday later this year when the newspaper, the first mass medium begins its fifth century of publication. The exact date of the first newspaper is not known, and was thought to have been during 1609 but recent evidence accepted by the World Association of Newspapers (WAN) pinpoints the year in which Strasbourg's Johann Carolus began printing his handwritten newsletters as 1605. Though radio, television, and the internet have long threatened to usurp print's status as the primary mass medium, the fact remains that print still garners more than half of the world's advertising expenditure.  Read More

Mixaerator sterilises water without chemicals

November 3, 2004 Queensland inventor Mike Lewis has developed an impellor that uses the same principles as salmon, bath water and tornadoes, however his ground-breaking technology is revolutionising water sterilising and providing environmentally-friendly methods to clean up toxic damage. Mike's invention- Mixaerator- with the Twin Vortex Advantage (TVA) works using dual vortices, like the ones that occur when you pull the plug from the bath, or those found in the air currents of tornadoes. "Salmon use similar vortices to my machine. That's how they leap up water falls, their fins send out mini whirlpools that create immense force to push them up," Mike said.  Read More

Professor Benjamin Eggleton (left)

Just as the transistor and microelectronics transformed communications and human society in the 20th century, "light" transistors and microphotonics are about to revolutionise the way we communicate in the 21st century. We are on the verge of a new revolution in computing and communications thanks to the breakthrough advances by a Sydney based research team led by Professor Benjamin Eggleton. A Federation Fellow and Research Director of the CUDOS Centre for Ultra-high bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems, Professor Eggleton recently received the prestigious 2004 Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year for his pioneering work in the field of optical physics and photonics. Optical fibres carry gigabytes of data across oceans and to our streets, hospitals, schools and businesses.  Read More

Man vs Machine World Chess Championship a draw

Thursday November 20, 2003 After treading a delicate path in game four, Garry Kasparov has drawn both the final game and the match against X3D Fritz in the latest Man vs Machine World Chess Championship. The first and last games of the match were drawn with X3D Fritz winning game two and Kasparov winning game three. The result still earns Kasparov $175,000 and the golden trophy - although X3D Fritz is storing a copy of the trophy in virtual reality given that it was a draw according to reports from x3DChess. Game four was the shortest game of the match. Kapsarov said after the game that despite outplaying the machine overall, a critical mistake in game two had cost him the match.  Read More

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