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Transgenic tobacco plants promise inexpensive cure for rabies

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February 5, 2013

New research has found that tobacco plants can be genetically modified to produce antibodi...

New research has found that tobacco plants can be genetically modified to produce antibodies against the rabies virus

We are familiar with the tobacco plant being harvested to create products that damage our health, but a new study from the Hotung Molecular Immunology Unit at St George’s University in London has shown that tobacco plants can be genetically modified to produce rabies antibodies. It's hoped that the research will deliver a safe, inexpensive way of treating rabies in developing countries.

If untreated, rabies can infect the central nervous system and lead to death. According to the World Health Organization, rabies occurs in more than 150 countries and territories around the world, killing 55,000 people every year, mostly in Asia and Africa. Treating it with human rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG) is expensive, a factor which the St George’s researchers believe can be addressed using this new approach.

The new study involved “humanizing” the genetic sequences for the murine monoclonal antibody – an antibody found in rodents that has been found to immunize against rabies – so that it could be tolerated by people. The tobacco plant was then turned into a “production platform” to carry the antibody.

The antibody produced from the genetically altered (or transgenic) plants was then investigated for its impact on rabies. It was found to be effective in treating a broad range of rabies viruses by preventing the virus from attaching itself to nerve endings around the bite, which stops it from traveling to the brain through the nerves.

"An untreated rabies infection is nearly 100 per cent fatal and is usually seen as a death sentence," says St George's PhD researcher Leonard Both. "Producing an inexpensive antibody in transgenic plants opens the prospect of adequate rabies prevention for low-income families in developing countries."

The findings could lead to further research involving other plants, although tobacco remains an attractive proposition as it is not a food crop.

The study was recently published in The FASEB Journal.

Source: St George's University

About the Author
Leon Gettler An award winning author and freelance journalist with a strong background in newspapers, magazines and podcasts, Leon is passionately drawn to all things innovative and unknown with a deep interest in telecommunications, environmental technology and design. When not indulging his passion for reading and writing, he can be found memorizing lines immortalized by Gerry Mulligan on baritone sax. He lives in Melbourne, Australia.   All articles by Leon Gettler
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2 Comments

"The findings could lead to further research involving other plants, although tobacco remains an attractive proposition as it is not a food crop."

But what if common food crops like corn could be made such that they essentially offer constant low-level vaccination against a multitude of diseases and infections? Wouldn't that be pretty darn cool?

Onihikage
6th February, 2013 @ 12:46 pm PST

The fact that it's made for 'developing countries' means that they're using the so-called third world for human testing. How magnanimous.

Vukile Mlonzi
7th February, 2013 @ 10:42 am PST
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