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Five new Alienware PCs invade the gaming market with aggressive looks and specs

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September 24, 2009

The Alienware M15x is the M17x's younger brother and is arguably the most powerful 15-inch...

The Alienware M15x is the M17x's younger brother and is arguably the most powerful 15-inch gaming laptop ever built.

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Demanding PC gamers could soon see their wildest dreams come true with the five new Alienware gaming rigs — a laptop and four desktop PCs — recently presented by Dell. From overclocked, liquid-cooled Intel Core i7 processors to the latest-generation NVIDIA GeForce graphics, these machines combine the very best of the industry for blazing fast performance and an unprecedented gaming experience.

The devices were jointly developed by Alienware and its parent company Dell, and feature aggressive design and great customization possibilities, which means that users will be able to find the right settings to accommodate nearly any budget.

Alienware M15x laptop

The Alienware M15x is the M17x's younger brother and was described by Dell as the most powerful 15-inch gaming laptop ever built. It is indeed quite an impressive machine: in its standard configuration it features an Intel mobile Core i7 720QM processor, 1GB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260M GPU, 3GB DDR3 @ 1.066 GHz, personalized plaque and real "badass" looks for USD$1,499.

However, the M15x also offers a myriad of configuration options including, among other things, 8BG RAM, a 256GB solid state drive, a 9-cell Li-ion battery for greater autonomy, dual layer Blu-ray burner, a 15.6-inch WideFHD 1920x1080 WLED display (the standard option being a "mere" 1600x900 WLED), and an even faster i7 920XM processor.

When those accessories are added to the package the price quickly skyrockets to USD$4,449 which — needless to say — is more than the average gamer can afford. But the standard configuration is arguably more than enough to satisfy performance-hungry gamers which, of all the additions listed above, will probably find the USD$100 9-cell battery upgrade (the default choice for the M17x) the most useful.

One last thing of note is the M15x's Stealth Mode, which can be turned on by pressing a simple button located directly above the keyboard and reduces CPU and GPU output to achieve a 65W power limit for decreased noise and improved battery life.

The Alienware desktop lineup

If performance-to-cost ratio is what you're looking for, the obvious choice is to opt for a desktop computer. Dell knows this very well and decided to develop not one, but four high-performance, liquid-cooled and overclocked desktop PCs aimed at extremely demanding gamers, professional video editors and 3D animators.

The Aurora and its "big brother" Aurora ALX are again high-performance, highly configurable machines featuring the latest Intel Core i7 processor. Optional features include an Extreme Edition i7 processor overclocked to 3.6GHz, up to 24GB DDR3 @ 1.33GHz memory or 12GB DDR3 @ 1.6GHz memory for a price tag starting at USD$1,299.

Finally, the Area-51 and Area-51 ALX represent the very best of the gamut and are designed for extremely powerful performance. The Intel Core i7 was overclocked to 3.86GHz, while the package includes the quad-GPU dual NVIDIA GeForce GTX 295 graphic card, up to 24GB of memory, and six hard drive bays that support 7,200 and 10,000RPM drives for prices beginning at USD$1,999.

Full specifications for the M15x and the Auroras can be found on Alienware's website, where they can already be ordered, while order forms and complete specs for the Area-51 will become available over the course of the next few weeks.

About the Author
Dario Borghino Dario studied software engineering at the Polytechnic University of Turin. When he isn't writing for Gizmag he is usually traveling the world on a whim, working on an AI-guided automated trading system, or chasing his dream to become the next European thumbwrestling champion.   All articles by Dario Borghino
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