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Pixit lets you customize your own rubber stamp, pixel by pixel

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April 22, 2013

Pixit is a reusable rubber stamp kit that lets you create your own design, and then change...

Pixit is a reusable rubber stamp kit that lets you create your own design, and then change it to a completely different one whenever you want

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If you've ever perused the rubber stamp section of a crafts store, then you know how pricey it can be to purchase just a handful of stamps, which print only a limited number of images. That's why some intrepid designers at Quirky developed the Pixit, a reusable rubber stamp kit that allows you to create your own design and then change it to a completely different one whenever you want.

The Pixit kit includes a stamp, a pen and an ink pad which are all designed to fit into a single, tidy box that measure just 70 x 7 x 55 mm (2.8 x 2.8 x 2.2 inches). To use the kit, first you sketch out a drawing on the dry-erase surface on the top of the stamp. Then, using a tool built into the pen, you press down each little square that the pen covered, locking them all into place. This eventually forms a pixelated version of your drawing, which can then be stamped anywhere you want using the accompanying ink pad.

Once you're done, all you have to do is press the "pixels" back into place, and it's ready for a new design. The whole thing is also made to be easily washed, so you won't leave any ink residue behind.

This eventually forms a pixelated version of your drawing, which can then be stamped anywh...

Naturally, Pixit can't create a design that's incredibly detailed, but pixel art has carved out a loyal niche in the world. At any rate, it's sure to be popular with retro gaming enthusiasts who want to recreate simple video game sprites.

A price and release date have not been set yet, but you can head over Quirky's website to vote on what price you'd prefer for a pixelated rubber stamp.

Source: Quirky via Gizmodo

About the Author
Jonathan Fincher Jonathan grew up in Norway, China, and Trinidad before graduating film school and becoming an online writer covering green technology, history and design, as well as contributing to video game news sites like Filefront and 1Up. He currently resides in Texas, where his passions include video games, comics, and boring people who don't want to talk about either of those things.   All articles by Jonathan Fincher
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5 Comments

I think this is really creative. I think it is great for those who are budget concious. I think it has a lot of potential.

BigWarpGuy
22nd April, 2013 @ 06:07 am PDT

I think that this is crap. limits creativity. buy a printer and crack open paint.

Matthias Sammitza
22nd April, 2013 @ 08:23 am PDT

What good is a printer when you want designs on things that arn't printer paper.

I think this is a good idea, maby not groundbreaking, but for kids and arts and crafts kinda people im sure people will find good uses for it.

Arahant
22nd April, 2013 @ 11:55 am PDT

I don't know. I like the idea of Pixit and it's customisable 8-bit cuteness, but the merits of Paint and a suitable PC-compatible printer cannot be underestimated. You decide... FIIIIIIIIGHT!!!!!

pATREUS
22nd April, 2013 @ 12:16 pm PDT

A 3D printer will make better stamp pads.

Slowburn
22nd April, 2013 @ 06:41 pm PDT
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