Have you ever craved pizza so strongly that you wished you could press a button and have one show up automatically? Clearly the creative minds at iStrategyLabs have run into this problem more than once, since that's exactly what they made recently. Rather than wading through options on a pizza shop's website, the PiePal allows users to push a single button to immediately order one or more pizzas to be delivered ASAP.

To place an order with the PiePal, users just turn the dial to select the number of pizzas they want and press the big button in the center. The device will then automatically contact the online ordering system at Domino's Pizza via Wi-Fi and set up a pre-selected type of pizza to be delivered from the nearest store. This all happens in the blink of an eye, and an LED on the button will light up to indicate when the order has gone through.

It may sound simple, but it did require some finesse from the designers at iStrategyLabs to streamline the entire ordering process. Unlike the pizza-ordering refrigerator magnet we saw last year, the PiePal sends the order itself instead of just syncing with a smartphone app.

A Raspberry Pi runs the device, using a custom JavaScript program specifically tailored to Domino's online service, while an Arduino board triggers the LEDs. The designers also created a straightforward web interface for users to adjust the PiePal's wireless settings, change their preferred pizza size and toppings, or even link it to their online Domino's account. After all this, the final step was to design a body for the PiePal and print it out of PLA using a MakerBot Replicator 2.

Right now, the designers are hoping to turn the PiePal into a consumer-ready product, but they need to test it a bit more first. iStrategyLabs is currently asking anyone interested in trying out the button for themselves to sign up as a "beta-taster" on its official site. There's no word yet on plans to adapt it for other restaurants.

In the meantime, check out the video below to see how the PiePal works.

Sources: PiePal, iStrategyLabs