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— Bicycles

Magura unveils wireless dropper post at Eurobike

By - August 26, 2015 4 Pictures

Dropper seat posts are becoming increasingly common on mountain bikes – among other things, they allow the rider to drop the saddle down out of the way when they’re adjusting their riding position on steep descents, but then pop it back up again afterwards. They do, however, require yet one more cable to strung along (or inside of) the frame. At this year’s Eurobike show in Germany, Magura has presented an alternative – the Vyron eLECT, which is the world’s first commercially-available wireless dropper seat post.

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— Science

3D-printed microscopic fish could be forerunners to smart "microbots"

By - August 26, 2015 3 Pictures

Tiny 3D-printed robotic fish smaller than the width of a human hair may one day deliver drugs to specific places in our bodies and sense and remove toxins, thanks to research at the University of California, San Diego. The so-called microfish are self-propelled, magnetically steered, and powered by hydrogen peroxide nanoparticles. And they might be just the first chip off the block for a future filled with "smart" microbots inspired by other biological organisms such as birds, each with its own specialized functionality.

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— Science

"Voltaglue" sticks in the wet and hardens when voltage is applied

By - August 26, 2015 2 Pictures

A glue that performs at a high-level in wet environments could bring about all sorts of possibilities in areas like surgical care and ship maintenance. A somewhat common approach to this problem has been trying to replicate the freakish ability of mussels to bind themselves to boats and jetties, but a team from Singapore's Nanyang Technological University is coming at it from a slightly different angle by developing a glue that hardens when an electrical charge is applied.

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— Science

Hybrid artificial photosynthesis technique produces hydrogen and methane

By - August 25, 2015 2 Pictures

Not content with using hybrid artificial photosynthesis to turn CO2 emissions into plastics and biofuel, researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) now claim to have produced an enhanced system that uses water and solar energy to generate hydrogen, which is in turn used to produce methane, the main element of natural gas, from carbon dioxide. Generating such gases from a renewable resource may one day help bolster, or even replace, fossil fuel resources extracted from dwindling sub-surface deposits.

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— Drones

Drones take the legwork out of tracking radio-tagged wildlife

By - August 25, 2015 6 Pictures

Radio tags have made things easier for environmental scientists tracking animal movements, but they still involve spending a lot of time and money traipsing over land by foot in search of a signal. This is particularly pertinent for Australian National University's (ANU) Debbie Saunders, who has spent years trying to track small, evasive birds. But work is set to become easier for Saunders and her team, who have developed the first radio-tracking drone that locates radio-tagged wildlife in a fraction of the time of previous methods.

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