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The BeoPlay A2 is Bang & Olufsen's first portable Bluetooth speaker

Portable Bluetooth speakers are handy for listening to music on the go, but freeing yourself from the hassle of wires doesn't mean much if you're always fretting over battery life. Bang & Olufsen's BeoPlay A2 may have you covered in this regard, as it promises 24 hours of continuous playback from a single charge – which the firm reckons is unmatched for a speaker of its size and type.  Read More

The use of UV light, special blue-light polymers and a clever safety trigger could make th...

Startup company Future Make 3D is developing the Polyes Q1, a 3D pen with a slew of safety features that aims to make it fun and safe for everyone – children included – to sketch out three-dimensional sculptures made of plastic. The cordless, USB-charged pen will come with standard, glow-in-the-dark, transparent and temperature-changing inks and is set to hit Kickstarter sometime next month.  Read More

A pound of flesh for 50p, by Alex Chinneck (Photo: Tommophoto)

Though we often hear complaints that modern architecture can't hold a candle to older buildings, few structures have as short a shelf-life as Alex Chinneck's latest creation. Following his Covent Garden-based levitating market building, the artist has returned with another architectural oddity. A pound of flesh for 50p is a full-size two-story home that's primarily built from wax, and is slowly melting away with stunning effect.  Read More

Surgeons have successfully transplanted a 'dead' heart into a patient (Photo: Victor Chang...

In a world first, surgeons at St Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney, Australia have successfully transplanted a "dead" heart into a patient. Thanks to the use of a revolutionary preservation solution, developed by the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute and St Vincent’s Hospital, the doctors were able to resuscitate and transplant the donor heart after it had stopped beating for up to 20-30 minutes.  Read More

Motorcycle lane splitting: faster and safer for riders, plus it makes the journey quicker ...

Recent research has confirmed what many motorcycle riders have known for years. "Lane splitting" – or riding in between lanes of traffic – obviously saves riders a lot of time, but it's also considerably safer than sitting in traffic and acting like a car, as long as it’s done within certain guidelines, and contrary to what many drivers think, it actually speeds up traffic for everyone else on the road. Riders, please pass this information on to the drivers in your lives.  Read More

Internet advertising revenues have twice regressed, firstly thanks to the initial internet...

On October 27, 1994, the first banner advert appeared, planting the commercial seed which has grown into a global phenomena. The tenth birthday in 2004 didn't make news, but this time it's cause to celebrate.  Read More

Alan Eustace enjoys the view as he ascends to an altitude of 135,890 ft (Photo: Atomic Ent...

Google exec, Alan Eustace, has broken the 128,100-ft (39,045-m) high-altitude skydive record set by Felix Baumgartner in October, 2012 (with much less fanfare). Jumping from a balloon at 135,890 ft (41,419 m) above Roswell, New Mexico, Eustace also set new world records for vertical speed and freefall distance.  Read More

Waste water from fracking is over five times saltier than seawater (Photo: Christopher Hal...

Fracking is a highly controversial and divisive issue. Proponents argue that it could be the biggest energy boom since the Arabian oil fields were opened almost 80 years ago, but this comes at a serious cost to the environment. Among the detrimental effects of the process is that the waste water it produces is over five times saltier than seawater, which is, to put it mildly, not good. A research team led by MIT that has found an economical way of removing salt from fracking waste water that promises to not only reduce pollution, but conserve water as well.  Read More

An Apple 1 computer was sold for $905,000 last week

When it was announced earlier this month that a 1976 Apple 1 motherboard would be up for grabs at the Bonhams' History of Science auction in New York, we wondered whether the sale prices such artifacts have attracted in the past adequately reflects their value as landmark innovations. This sale looks to have bucked the trend in the most emphatic fashion, attracting a successful bid of US$905,000 and becoming the most expensive Apple computer ever sold.  Read More

The Yardarm Sensor fits into the grip of a firearm to monitor use in real time

Anytime a police officer draws their weapon, it's likely to be a tense, confusing situation where split second decisions can be the difference between life and death. In an attempt to reduce some of the confusion, Yardarm has developed a wireless sensor that allows firearms to be tracked and monitored in real time thanks to a small electronics package that fits into the weapon's grip.  Read More

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