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— Computers

Intel debuts 6th gen Core processor family at IFA 2015

Intel says there are over 500 million computers in use today that are at least 5 years old, frustrating users with slow wake-up times, the inability to wander away from a wall socket for very long and sluggish overall performance. Today at IFA 2015 in Berlin, the company introduced its new 6th generation Core and Xeon processor families that promise 2.5x faster performance over what was available 5 years ago, 30x better graphics and 3x the battery life.

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— Computers

Seagate packs 2 TB of storage into 7 mm-thick laptop hard drive

When it comes to data storage capacity, too much is never enough. But Seagate is doing its best to sate people's craving for gigabytes on the go by announcing the world's highest capacity 2.5-inch hard drive. Equaling the 2 TB capacity of the Samsung Spinpoint M9T that the company unveiled back in 2013, the new drive is 2.5 mm thinner than that unit, stretching the calipers to just 7 mm.

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— Automotive

Land Rover's Transparent Trailer concept keeps the rear view clear

Last year, Land Rover unveiled its Discovery Vision concept with its Transparent Bonnet, which used cameras and virtual technology to make the front of the car appear "transparent" to the driver. It was a clever idea for eliminating blind spots, but what if you're hauling a caravan or a horse box? To help eliminate this massive rear blind spot, the company has developed a prototype "Transparent Trailer" system, which extends virtual translucence to the rear.

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— Science

Ultra low-power wireless communication through the human body using magnetic fields

Be it on the inside or the outside, the human body is becoming host to an ever-increasing array of electronic devices that need to wirelessly communicate with each other. Now engineers working at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have come up with a different type of wireless communication that sends ultra low-power magnetic fields through the human body. This makes it extraordinarily more energy efficient and secure from prying eyes than comparable wireless communication technologies. Read More
— Space

World's most powerful digital camera gets the go-ahead

A smartphone with a 16-megapixel camera may seem cutting edge, but it won't impress astronomers now that the US Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has given the green light to start construction of the world's largest digital camera. With a resolution of 3.2-gigapixels (enough to need 1,500 high-definition television screens to display one image), the new camera is at the heart of the 8.4-meter (27.5-ft) Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) now under construction atop Cerro Pachón in Chile.

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— Medical

Mouth guard could continuously monitor diabetes, and more

We've already heard about an electronics-packing mouthguard that can be used to detect serious impacts to the head. Now, scientists at the University of California, San Diego have developed one that could provide continuous readings of users' health markers including lactate, cortisol and uric acid. It may be used to monitor the well-being of people such as diabetics, to track the performance of athletes, or to detect stress in soldiers.

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