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— Mobile Technology

iPhone OS 4.0 - new features plus another kick in the pants for Adobe

By - April 12, 2010 1 Picture
Apple yesterday released information about the upcoming revision to its iPhone operating system - iPhone OS 4.0, which is due for release in June. It offers major enhancements like multitasking, the iBooks eBook reader app, a centralized gaming service, performance and battery life improvements. But while the new software will be a boon for iPhone 3GS and iPad owners, as well as buyers of the next-gen iPhone HD expected to debut sometime this year, it seems that iPhone 2G, 3G and older iPod Touch owners might be left behind on the upgrade trail. Oh - and the new developer kit contains another nasty surprise for Adobe. Read More
— Motorcycles

Yogo electric scooter features fast-charging removable battery

By - April 11, 2010 6 Pictures
The yogo, by fledgling British company econogo, is the UK's first and only full production electric scooter that has removable lithium batteries. What’s so good about that? Well, instead of having to run an extension lead from a mains electricity socket inside the house or garage, the yogo’s removable battery allows owners to recharge their scooter’s battery inside their home - or office, which greatly increases the flexibility of a scooter that only has a range of 22 miles per battery charge. Carry another charged battery with you and double the distance you can travel before having to recharge (it only takes an hour). With a top speed of 38mph, the Yogo’s 1.5kW motor is billed as the equivalent of 100cc motorbike. Read More
— Pets

Bionaire's high-tech cat litter box

By - April 11, 2010 1 Picture
Last year we brought you the story of the OdorBox, a cat toilet that removes those tell-tale signs (smell) that your feline has voided itself. Bionaire’s version - the Odor Grabber Air-Cleaning Litter Box - is designed to suck those “breath-snatching” smells away before they permeate the room and ruin your dinner party. Read More
— Around The Home

Reflectius clock tells time with a single laser

By - April 11, 2010 3 Pictures
Ever since the first sundial cast its shadow we've been looking for new and inventive ways to tell the time. Timepieces that talk to you, use LED lights instead of numbers and spell out the time in words are just some of the results, and although the Reflectius concept from Art Lebedev Studio (think Optimus keyboard) uses a standard digital readout as the display, the way it achieves this is anything but standard. Read More
— Robotics

European institutions creating 'World Wide Web for robots'

By - April 11, 2010 2 Pictures
Back in February, we brought you the story of Willow Garage Robotics’ PR2 Beta Program. California-based Willow Garage is giving PR2 robots to ten deserving robotics development groups, to program and customize as they wish. In exchange, those groups will enter all of their research data into an open-source software platform, so other robotics designers can learn from their successes and failures. Now, we’ve received word that a similar project is in the works in Europe. Led by the Eindhoven University of Technology, six research institutes are developing a collective worldwide online memory for robots, wherein robots can learn from each other's capabilities, thus streamlining the process of adopting new operations. Read More
— Medical

Enzyme that breaks down carbon nanotubes gives hope for medical applications

By - April 11, 2010 1 Picture
Nanotechnology is increasingly a part of our lives, and while it has enormous potential for the effective delivery of medication and fighting cancer, there are concerns about health effects such as toxicity and tissue damage. Now a team of scientists has shown that carbon nanotubes can be broken down by an enzyme found in white blood cells - contradicting the previous belief they are not broken down in the body or nature - and hope this new understanding may lead to a way to render carbon nanotubes harmless in medical applications. Read More
— Telecommunications

Smartphone sensor could detect toxic chemicals

By - April 10, 2010 1 Picture
Our smartphones can already surf the Net, take photos and videos, play games, and even make phone calls, so why not... have them smell the air? That what America’s Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate would like to see happen. The Cell-All initiative would see cell phones equipped with a sensor capable of detecting deadly chemicals. In the event of a terrorist chemical attack, the device could conceivably save numerous lives. Read More

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