Advertisement
— Health & Wellbeing

Ultrasound said to offer better technique for measuring blood pressure

Not only is the old inflatable-cuff-around-the-arm an uncomfortable way of having one's blood pressure measured, but it turns out that it doesn't always provide enough information, either. If a physician wishes to check for vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis or aneurysms, for instance, they're going to want to know how the blood is flowing in areas besides the patient's arm. Because the cuff works by temporarily stopping the blood flow, however, it's not going to work too well on a patient's neck or torso. Fortunately, scientists from The Netherlands' Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have discovered that ultrasound can be used instead, and that it provides more details. Read More
— Wearables

'Hearing dummies' allow for tailor-made hearing aids

When a tailor is making an item of custom-fit clothing, they first take the client’s measurements, then adjust a mannequin known as a tailor’s dummy, to match those measurements. That way, as they’re making the clothing, they can check the fit on the dummy, instead of repeatedly bringing in the actual client. When it comes to hearing aids, however, clients often need to pay follow-up visits to the hearing clinic, in order to get the device adjusted so it suits their particular type of hearing loss. Recently, though, a team from the University of Essex have developed software that creates virtual “hearing dummies.” These could allow for hearing aids to be tailor-made for each client’s needs, right from the start. Read More
— Aircraft

Elbit tests Forward Ground Control Station (FGCS) for Skylark I LE man-packable UAS

Israeli defense technology company Elbit has successfully tested an interesting new Forward Ground Control Station (FGCS) for its Skylark I LE man-packable Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). The lightweight FCGS is 15 kg (33 lbs) lighter than the existing Skylark ground control system and is designed to enable dismounted soldiers to carry minimum gear for optimal operational efficiency, as the UAS can be launched by Dispatcher Units well to the rear, transferring control of the operation to the FGCS-equipped Forward Units when the UAS reaches their range. Read More
— Laptops

Intel gets some competition – AMD A-series CPU/GPU hybrids are on the way

Laptop buyers do not have much of a choice in terms of CPUs these days with the market dominated by Sandy Bridge and other Intel solutions, but some competition is on the way. Today, AMD officially announced a full range of multi-core chips for laptops combining CPU and GPU, the so-called APUs (Accelerated Processing Units). These complement the AMD Fusion family, and were previously known as "Llano." Read More
— Good Thinking

Female fitbot robot added to Fits.me Virtual Fitting Room

The Fits.me virtual fitting room is an online changing room where you simply enter your sizing statistics and a robotic mannequin models how various sizes will look on your torso - all from the comfort of your own home. Among a host of advantages, the virtual fitting room saves time - the one commodity destined to always be in short supply and solves the single biggest problem for online fashion retail - the lack of a fitting room. When it was introduced for men last year, sales to new customers increased by 57%, and sales to international customers doubled. Now it's available for women too. Read More
— Science

Assyrian Dictionary Project completed after ninety years

If you come across a word or phrase in another language, a printed or online dictionary is usually a good place to look for help. If you're faced with a language that's long been dead, however, then you've got problems. Those studying the cuneiform texts of Mesopotamian clay tablets or stone carvings now have reason to rejoice. After nine decades, the University of Chicago's Assyrian Dictionary Project has finally been completed - opening an encyclopedic window into the day to day lives of people from one of the world's first civilizations. Read More
— Mobile Technology

American Airlines adds Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablets to in-flight menu

Samsung Mobile has sealed an agreement with AA that will see 6,000 of its Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablets replacing ordinary in-flight screens on selected transcontinental and international flights from later this year. With passengers now being provided with tablet computers and cabin staff on some airlines also using them on the job, it only leaves the pilots – and they're set to join the tablet party in the not too distant future as well. Read More
— Environment

'Cambridge crude' could let EVs refuel like gas-powered vehicles

With consumers used to the convenience of refueling their vehicle at the gas station in a few minutes, one of the biggest disadvantages of electric vehicles is the time it takes to recharge their batteries. Now, by separating the energy storage and energy discharging functions of the battery into separate physical structures, researchers at MIT have achieved a breakthrough that could allow EVs to be recharged in the same time it takes to refuel a conventional car. The technology could also provide an inexpensive alternative for energy storage for intermittent, renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. Read More
— Science

'Thermally activated cooling system' puts waste heat to use

Automobiles, appliances, power plants, factories and electrical utilities all waste one thing: heat. More specifically, they produce heat as a by-product of their normal operations, but that heat is just dispersed into the air instead of being put to use. Researchers from Oregon State University, however, have created a prototype system that harnesses waste heat to (rather ironically) cool the device that’s creating the heat in the first place. While it isn’t the first system to do so, it is claimed to be unusually efficient ... and, it can generate electricity. Read More
— VR

Futuristic immersive cocoon concept puts viewers in the picture

While advocates proclaim the superior immersive qualities of 3D, the current crop of 3D TVs can actually have the opposite effect on many people by giving the impression of peering into a box filled with tiny - albeit 3D - people. Design and advertising firm NAU proposes a different solution with its latest concept dubbed the Immersive Cocoon that looks to provide the sense of immersion without the 3D. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement