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— Electronics

Medea vodka bottle with programmable LED display

By - April 14, 2010 1 Picture
You’re in a nightclub and spy a ridiculously good-looking member of the opposite sex across a crowded room. And while that person seems unattached, your delivery of pick-up lines is appalling (obvious from your lack of partners). So, what do you do? You grab your high-tech bottle of Medea vodka, pull up a chair at the person's table let them read your “message on a bottle”. Honestly, I can’t think of another reason for having an LED ticker on bottle. “Happy birthday” doesn’t cut it, nor does "Hello, my name is ... ", but for the shy or clumsy, a well though-out digital message could be just the thing to get you over the line. The only problem is … you need to be sober to program the darn thing. Read More
— Computers

DIVAS multimedia search engine finds content using digital ‘fingerprints’

By - April 14, 2010 1 Picture
Text-based searches might be great for hunting down relevant chunks of text-based information, but searches for multimedia content can be a little more hit and miss. Searches that rely on manually assigned metadata and often misleading titles can return off topic results, while searches that require the unpacking of compressed data can slow up the search. DIVAS is a new multimedia search engine that addresses these problems by using digital "fingerprints" that, according to its developers, return more reliable results. Read More
— Good Thinking

Universal Subtitles aims to caption or translate every web video

By - April 14, 2010 1 Picture
Participatory Culture Foundation (PCF), the non-profit organization that makes Miro - the cross-platform, free software video player and downloader - has embarked on a Herculean task of subtitling all videos on the Web. PCF is creating Universal Subtitles, an open standard protocol that will allow clients such as Firefox extensions, desktop video players, websites, or browsers to find and download matching subtitles from subtitle databases when they play video. But first, the company needs the subtitles. That’s where you come in. Read More
— Electronics

Sony unveils first professional field monitor with OLED display

By - April 14, 2010 2 Pictures
While we wait for bigger, cheaper OLED displays to knock LCD and plasmas off their perch, Sony has released the first field display to use an Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) display panel. The PVM-740 is a 7.4-inch 960 x 540 pixel resolution portable monitor designed for professional users (with professionally deep pockets) that offers picture contrast greater than a CRT display and is less affected by ambient light, allowing images to be viewed even in strong sunlight. Read More
— Mobile Technology

UCSD engineers working towards faster wireless networks… for everyone

By - April 14, 2010 2 Pictures
Electrical engineers from University of California San Diego (UCSD) are building the foundations for wireless networks of the future. Hoping to bring mass access to the the kind of high capacity, extremely low power wireless networks found only in expensive defense and satellite applications, the researchers are merging silicon chip technologies with sophisticated wireless communications tools in the millimeter and microwave range. This work, according to UCSD, could result in personal wireless networks that make current high-speed wireless connections feel slower than the dial-up connections from the early 1990s. Read More
— Science

New PV cell generates electricity from UV and IR light

By - April 14, 2010 1 Picture
Last month at the meeting of the Japan Society of Applied Physics, a research group from the Kyoto Institute of Technology introduced a new photovoltaic cell that is capable of generating electricity not only from visible light, but from ultraviolet and infrared light as well. The research group, led by associate professor Saki Sonoda, hopes that this will lead to a more efficient PV cell that can be single-junction rather than the more conventional multi-junction. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Sharp's four-primary-color LCD TVs go 3D

By - April 13, 2010 2 Pictures
Anyone who has had a chance to experience 3D, whether it be at the cinema or on one of the multitude of 3D TVs hitting the market, will be aware that image brightness takes a hit thanks to the eyewear required for the 3D effect, be they passive or active shutter. Now Sharp has given its four-primary-color TVs we first saw at CES earlier this year the 3D treatment. The company says the sets not only boast the industry’s highest brightness, but also feature extremely low "crosstalk" – the undesirable double “ghost” images evident with many 3D TVs. Read More

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