Advertisement
more top stories »
— Sports

New tech will make helmets stink when they need to be replaced

By - June 7, 2010 1 Picture
We’re told that we should replace our bike helmets every couple of years or so, because minuscule cracks can develop over time, rendering them structurally unsound. For the same reason, we’re supposed to replace a helmet that has withstood a direct impact immediately, no questions asked. The problem is... it’s so hard to get yourself to throw away what looks like a perfectly good helmet, just because it might no longer be effective. New technology developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials should eliminate this situation. When your helmet is getting past its prime, it will start to smell. If it develops any large cracks... well, you’d better plug your nose. Read More
— Digital Cameras

DXG and Aiptek beat big boys to the punch with 3D camcorders

By - June 7, 2010 18 Pictures
In case you hadn’t heard, 3D is the big news in entertainment this year with all the big players releasing 3D capable sets designed to tempt the eyeballs and loosen the purse strings. Unfortunately, there’s still a bit of a shortage of native 3D content and the opportunities to create your own are largely limited to the world of deep-pocketed professionals. That looks set to change with a couple of less well-known players, Aiptek and DXG, staking an early claim on the 3D consumer camera market. We checked out their offerings at Computex 2010. Read More
— Computers

Home built Windows touchscreen tablet is quite the performer

By - June 7, 2010 7 Pictures
Rather than make do with an iPad or wait for other manufacturers to create the desired "Windows 7 touchscreen tablet with a large screen that could handle HD video and wasn't too thick or power hungry," Justin Campana decided to try and create his own. The process involved breaking open an MSI X320 notebook, overlaying a touchscreen interface and creating custom carbon fiber casing to house the new 13.4 inch high definition LED backlit touchscreen tablet with accelerometer and SSD storage. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Sony's new Bravia 3D TV is watching you

By - June 7, 2010 2 Pictures
Are you one of those people who like to have the TV on just for a bit of background noise? Or perhaps you'll leave it on while you're surfing the net or reading a book, in the hope that whatever comes on next will be a bit more interesting. If this sounds like you, then you might stand to save a few dollars on your power bills should you decide to get one of the new Sony Bravia TVs with Face Detection and Presence Sensor technology. These new features, which will dim or turn off the screen if you look away or leave the room, are included in the new Sony LX900 3D TVs due out any day now. Whilst Hitachi also appears to be researching facial recognition technologies for televisions, it looks like Sony is going to be the first to release a product with these capabilities. Read More
— Medical

Printable prescription pills will be safer and faster-acting

By - June 6, 2010 1 Picture
Compressed tablets are the most popular dosage form in use today. About two-thirds of all prescriptions are dispensed as solid dosage forms and half of these are compressed tablets. What may surprise many people is that nearly 99.9 percent of most prescription tablets are actually filler. The active ingredient is usually just one thousandth of a pill, so it has to be mixed with other ingredients to make the medicine big enough to pick up and swallow. The second thing that may surprise you is that the underlying production process has remained largely unchanged for over a thousand years ... though quality assurance is a lot better these days. Now researchers are looking at a fundamental shift in methodology which promises to create safer and faster-acting medicines – "printing" pills to order. Read More
— Military

Navy ray gun shoots down robotic targets

By - June 6, 2010 1 Picture
If you own an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), here’s piece of advice: don’t fly it near San Nicholas Island, California, or it could be blasted out of the sky – by a laser. Two such vehicles were successfully shot down there on May 24th by a US Navy laser weapon. According to the official press release, this marks "the first detect-thru-engage laser shoot-down of a threat representative target in an over-the-water, combat representative scenario.” Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Subscribe to Gizmag's email newsletter

Advertisement