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— Digital Cameras

Samsung introduces the Wi-Fi enabled ST80 point-and-shoot

By - July 30, 2010 2 Pictures
The forthcoming ST80 point-and-shoot from Samsung will allow users to upload photos and videos while on the move. The 14.2 megapixel camera has built-in Wi-Fi to cater to the immediate sharing of important moments with friends and family via email, or through social networking sites like Facebook and YouTube. The slim compact also features in-camera editing and comes with technology to sync with other wireless devices such as digital photo frames. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Sending out an SOS with the Stress Outsourced massage jacket

By - July 30, 2010 12 Pictures
The phenomenon of social networking allows fragmented friends and families to keep in touch and empowers users to share their lives with the world. Four female students from MIT think that such a medium could also help to alleviate something else that many members of the global community share and suffer from - stress. The SOS: stress outsourced system consists of wearable units containing wireless signaling technology. Should a wearer feel the burden of stress, sending out an SOS to fellow users around the globe generates a haptic massage from the relief signals sent in response. Read More
— Science

Straining graphene creates strongest pseudo-magnetic fields ever sustained in a lab

By - July 30, 2010 2 Pictures
Graphene, the one-atom-thick material made up of a honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms, has produced yet another in a long list of experimental surprises. Its remarkable properties have already got researchers excited regarding its applications for faster computers, cheaper and more efficient batteries and vastly higher density mass data storage. Now researchers have reported the creation of pseudo-magnetic fields far stronger than the strongest magnetic fields ever sustained in a laboratory – just by putting the right kind of strain onto a patch of graphene. The breakthrough could have far reaching scientific applications. Read More
— Space

Kepler space observatory continues search for Earth-like planets

By - July 29, 2010 8 Pictures
Launched on March 6, 2009, the Kepler spacecraft is continuing to scan the heavens for Earth-like exoplanets. The $US591 million Kepler boasts the largest camera ever sent into space, incorporating a 0.95-meter diameter Schmidt telescope with an array of 42 CCDs, each with 2200x1024 pixels. NASA has recently released 43 days-worth of data covering more than 156,000 stars in the Cygnus-Lyra region of our galaxy, but more analysis is needed before any conclusive findings can be made. Read More
— Electronics

Intel creates first silicon-based optical data connection with transmission rates up to 50Gbps

By - July 29, 2010 4 Pictures
Today’s computer components are connected to each other using copper cables or traces on circuit boards. Due to the signal degradation that comes with using metals such as copper to transmit data, these cables have a limited maximum length. This limits the design of computers, forcing processors, memory and other components to be placed just inches from each other. Intel has announced an important breakthrough that could see light beams replace the use of electrons to carry data in and around computers, enabling data to move over much longer distances and at speeds many times faster than today’s copper technology. Read More
— Good Thinking

The Humane Reader uses 8-bit technology to bring Wikipedia to developing countries

By - July 29, 2010 3 Pictures
When you search for just about anything on the Internet, it seems like a Wikipedia entry on that subject is almost always amongst the top ten hits. Despite rumors of dissent within its ranks, the encyclopedic website is one of the largest single repositories of knowledge in the world. So, with that in mind, what do you do if you want to bring a significant portion of the information on the Internet to people who can’t afford net access? You load a searchable offline version of Wikipedia onto a US$20 8-bit computer, that they can watch through their TVs. That’s what computer consultant Braddock Gaskill has done with his Humane Reader, which he hopes will find a place in homes, schools and libraries in developing nations. Read More
— Environment

Frog Design and ECOtality team up for smart EV charging solution

By - July 29, 2010 5 Pictures
Well, it was only a matter of time. Electric vehicle charging stations aren’t even commonplace yet, but already someone has come up with a better-looking one. Frog Design, well-known for developing cool concepts such as an Intel Point-of-Sale kiosk and a range of wearable devices, has teamed up with clean energy company ECOtality to create the Blink EV charging station. There are two versions, one for homes and one for commercial use, and they’re both pretty snazzy. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

QUIETPRO+ Intelligent Hearing System headed offshore

By - July 29, 2010 3 Pictures
It’s a problem as old as the protective earplug itself - if you block out the loud, harmful noises, you also block out the quieter sounds, such as peoples’ voices... that is, unless you’ve got a QUIETPRO+ Intelligent Hearing System stuck in your ears. The setup consists of a pair of fairly regular-looking in-ear plugs, wired iPod-style to a small electronic control unit. When the system detects a dangerously-loud noise, it automatically sends noise-canceling sound waves to the headset. When things are quiet, it amplifies sounds like human voices, so the user is actually able to hear better than they would without it. Read More
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