Advertisement
— Mobile Technology

8-inch PMP with glasses-free 3D priced at US$179

Despite the facts that there isn't much appropriate 3D content, and the viewing angles required for the 3D effect are limited (as was described in our Nintendo 3DS review) the list of glasses-free 3D gadgets increases. The HTC EVO 3D smartphone was the latest addition, but certainly won't be the last. Perhaps not many readers have heard of the Chinese manufacturer Gadmei, although there is at least one reason to become acquainted with it. The company has released its P83 portable media player (PMP), which is capable of displaying 3D videos and images that are viewable without glasses, and is certainly one of the most inexpensive devices of its kind offered so far. Read More
— Environment

U.S. Army aims for more energy-efficient base camps

The U.S. Army has opened a System Integration Laboratory (SIL) at Fort Devens, Massachusetts, modeled after forward operating bases in Iraq and Afghanistan to test technologies aimed at creating more energy-efficient base camps. The various energy-efficient technologies being tested are expected to reduce base camp fuel requirements by 20 percent or more and water demand by up to 75 percent. Read More
— Electronics

Silver pen allows electrical circuits to be handwritten on paper and other surfaces

People have been using pens to jot down their thoughts for thousands of years but now engineers at the University of Illinois have developed a silver-inked rollerball pen that allows users to jot down electrical circuits and interconnects on paper, wood and other surfaces. Looking just like a regular ballpoint pen, the pen’s ink consists of a solution of real silver that dries to leave electrically conductive silver pathways. These pathways maintain their conductivity through multiple bends and folds of the paper, enabling users to personally fabricate low-cost, flexible and disposable electronic devices. Read More
— Science

MIT researchers give graphene band gap and open the door for post-silicon electronic devices

Earlier this year we ran a story on molybdenite, a mineral that held an advantage over graphene for use in electronic devices due to the existence of "band gaps" in the material that are needed for devices such as transistors, computer chips and solar cells. Now MIT researchers have overcome that deficiency by finding a way to produce graphene in significant quantities in a two- or three-layer form with the layers arranged just right to give the material the much-desired band gap. Read More
— Environment

Researchers cut waste and lower cost of 'CIGS' solar cells using inkjet printing technology

Traditional solar cell production techniques are usually time consuming and require expensive vacuum systems or toxic chemicals. Depositing chemical compounds such as CIGS on a substrate using vapor phase deposition also wastes most of the expensive material in the process. For the first time, engineers at Oregon State University (OSU) have now developed a process to create "CIGS" solar cells with inkjet printing technology that allows for precise patterning to reduce raw material waste by 90 percent and significantly lower the cost of producing solar cells with promising, yet expensive compounds. Read More
— Bicycles

GOKISO Aerospace Hub for bicycles aims to give bearings a break

If you’ve ever watched the Tour de France and winced as all those skinny-wheeled racing bikes bounced over the cobblestone roads ... well, you were right to do so. Not only are such hard, rough surfaces capable of bending rims, but they’re also hard on hub bearings – as the axle shaft flexes ever-so-slightly in response to hitting bumps, the ball bearings that encircle it are pressed against the hub’s bearing races, both causing friction and potentially damaging the bearings. Japan’s Kondo Machine Corporation, however, has created a product that is claimed to minimize this problem. It’s the “jet-engine-inspired” GOKISO Aerospace Hub, and we spied it last week at the 49th Paris Air Show. Read More
— Wearables

AKG unveils 1,000-euro stainless steel earbuds

There are a lot of nice new electronic gizmos that you could buy for 1,000 euro, which currently equals out to about US$1,435. You could purchase the world’s smallest interchangeable-lens camera (the Pentax Q) and have change left over, you could buy six LaCie CloudBox hard drive/cloud storage devices, six HTC EVO 3D smartphones, or you could get yourself a pair of earbuds ... AKG’s K3003 reference class 3-way earphones, to be precise. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Glasses-free HTC EVO 3D smartphone announced for Europe, available in U.S.

The range of gadgets capable of stereoscopic glasses-free 3D viewing is slowly increasing, with the LG Optimus 3D, Sharp Aquos SH-12C and Nintendo 3DS gaming console already on the market. HTC has now announced that its first glasses-free 3D smartphone, the HTC EVO 3D, will be available in Europe in July. Unveiled in March 2011 and introduced in the U.S. by Sprint on June 24, the EVO 3D features a stereoscopic 3D display, allowing users to view three-dimensional images without glasses, plus the phone is able to capture pictures in 3D. Read More
— Motorcycles

Two new middleweight adventure bikes: Honda's Crossrunner, Suzuki's new V-Strom 650

"Adventure" bikes are about as practical and unglamorous as motorcycling gets. They're fairly ugly to look at, they're often ridden hard and put away wet, they're taken to dirty places and they have dirty things done to them. Which to my mind has always made them a preserve of the hardcore rider - these are not ridden by Harley polishers or leather-clad latte sippers, they're ridden by folks that like to get out and throw motorcycles around out where it's tough. So it's encouraging to see that the adventure class is heating up more than ever in 2011 - and two new middleweight all-roaders from Suzuki and Honda now come into a mix that's becoming almost saturated with bikes like the Kawasaki Versys, the BMW F800GS, the Yamaha Tenere and Triumph's Tiger 800. Read More
— Automotive

Pike Peak hillclimb records smashed

Sixty-one year old motorsport legend Nobuhiro 'Monster' Tajima, almost certainly the oldest world class athlete competing in any sport today, won his sixth consecutive Pikes Peak International Hill Climb on Sunday, at the same time as breaking the long standing 10 minute barrier for the course which rises 1.5 kilometers from start to oxygen-starved finish. Nissan's electric LEAF established a new electric car record for the course and Ducati's "four bikes in 1" Multistrada defended its 2010 win with a new record too. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement