2015 Detroit NAIAS Auto Show
Ferrari announces free Roadside Assistance service for all cars not covered by warranty

We suspect that the retained value figures for all Ferrari automobiles just took a significant hike in value. In a stunning move, Ferrari has announced the launch of a new “With You” roadside assistance service which will be provided free of charge to owners of all Prancing Horse cars built since 1947 and not covered by either existing factory or POWER warranties. Under the new scheme, Ferrari clients will not only enjoy 12 months of roadside assistance if their vehicle breaks down, but also be offered cover for expenses involved in returning home or reaching the Ferrari Authorised Service Centre to which their car has been taken. The service is free, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, initially for Italian and UK owners, but to be extended to other European markets in the near future. No announcement has yet been made as to whether the scheme will be extended beyond Europe.  Read More

The Cranklock in action

Seconds are everything in cycle racing. A 10-second gap on the nearest guy behind you means he's got to work his butt off just to stay in touch. So a device that can reliably give you an effort-free 20-second advantage on a 3km twisty downhill stage is clearly going to be dynamite in the racing market. It's called the Cranklock, and it allows cyclists to enjoy motorcycle-style lean angles and massively improved cornering speeds by putting your center of gravity low and to the inside of the corner, like you can on a motorcycle. And if initial reactions from pro racers in New Zealand are any indication, it's going to revolutionize the world of competitive cylcing. Oh - and there's safety and security benefits for your average road rider, too. This is a sensational idea.  Read More

The assembled Mnemosyne

If there’s one thing you could expect to rely on when it comes to Flash memory it’s that as capacities increase over time, prices decrease. It’s a rule that has been borne out over the years and its continuation has been a source of comfort that everything is right with the world. Now Japan’s Solid Alliance has thrown our world askew with the release of the Mnemosyne, a 16GB flash drive that is yours for the paltry sum of one million yen (approx. USD$10,000.)  Read More

The 1906 San Fransisco earthquake killed over 3,000. A new technology could help shield bu...

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, there are 500,000 detectable earthquakes every year, of which 100,000 will be felt and about 100 will cause damage. Engineers now use seismic vibration control technology - and base isolation in particular – to make buildings more earthquake-proof. But what about existing structures? Researchers from the University of Liverpool have now developed a means of effectively making buildings “invisible” to the destructive path of a quake.  Read More

No need to worry, it's just a nuclear blast

According to a report in the Israeli newspaper, Yediot Ahronoth, US and Israeli researchers have developed a drug that offers protection from the damaging effects of radiation sickness. The medication could not only provide effective protection in the event of a nuclear or “dirty bomb” attack, but it could also enable cancer patients to be treated with more powerful doses of radiation.  Read More

A rendering showing what the street lights might look like in a typical urban street. With...

It provides light where there is darkness, it gives a sense of safety and security, but it's also a power leech. The humble street light. Thankfully, the move away from the grid is already well underway with companies like Urban Green Energy busy transforming these familiar towers of light into self sufficient beacons that harness the power of the elements - in this case, it's a hybrid solution that uses both the wind and the sun.  Read More

Timing of the optical writing, write and read signals. (Photo: Haruka Tanji, Saikat Ghosh,...

Scientists are rapidly achieving important breakthroughs in quantum computing, from obtaining precise manipulation of four photons at the same time to the very first quantum processors. But just like in traditional electronics, a quantum computer can't be realized with information processing alone — we need a reliable way to store and retrieve quantum information too. A new breakthrough by MIT researchers represents a step forward in acheiving this goal of high-fidelity quantum memory.  Read More

The solar powered robotic pool skimmer

For many a pool owner, removing the assorted leaves, bugs and other foliage that finds its way into the water can be a drain on their time in the backyard. Enter the smart Solar Powered Pool Skimmer, which not only takes the elbow grease out of keeping the pool sparkling, but as the name suggests, adds the bonus of being powered by the sun.  Read More

The K-box turns any flat surface into a giant speaker

As personal music players like the iPod become ubiquitous, there’s another developing trend that’s even more insidious: the desire to share that music with everyone else. Miini speakers are flooding the market at the moment, but a new product called the Kerchoonz K-box promises to make even more noise. A compact, mobile-phone sized device, the K-box turns any flat surface – wall, table, window, ceiling – into a giant speaker.  Read More

The Eternaleds HydraLux-4 liquid-cooled LED bulb

Liquid-cooled PCs are a mainstay for PC enthusiasts looking to eek every last bit of performance from their beloved machines and now it seems this approach has reached the world of the LED light bulb. A company called Eternaleds has introduced the HydraLux-4 LED Bulb, the world’s first LED light bulb to use "liquid-cooling technology" to give a true 360-degree light like a regular incandescent light bulb.  Read More

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