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— Science

New images reveal moon isn’t as ‘full’ as it used to be – and could still be shrinking

By - August 19, 2010 4 Pictures
The moon is shrinking according to a team analyzing new images from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The images reveal previously unknown cliffs, called lobate scarbs. These are thrust faults that occur primarily in the lunar highlands that indicate the moon shrank globally in the geologically recent past and might still be shrinking today. Although they were first recognized in photographs taken near the moon's equator by the panoramic cameras flown on the Apollo 15, 16 and 17 missions, the fourteen previously unknown lobate scarbs revealed by the very high resolution images taken by the LRO camera indicate that the thrust faults are globally distributed and not clustered near the moon’s equator. Read More
— Medical

'Flower Bouquet' nanoclusters strengthen titanium implant attachments

By - August 19, 2010 3 Pictures
More than 1,000 tons (2.2 million pounds) of titanium devices are implanted in patients worldwide every year with joint replacements one of the more common procedures. Light, strong and totally biocompatible, titanium is one of the few materials that naturally match the requirements for implantation in the human body. Researchers have now developed an improved coating technique that could strengthen the connection between titanium joint-replacement implants with a patient’s own bone. The stronger connection – created by manipulating signals the body’s own cells use to encourage growth – could allow the implants to last longer. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Marmota mobile AR identifies landscape features

By - August 19, 2010
Augmented Reality, or AR, is currently one of the hot areas for mobile app development – for some reason, people seem quite smitten with the idea of being able to point their mobile device’s camera at a street, and having information about the buildings and businesses that appear on their screen superimposed over the images in real time. Now, a prototype mobile AR device is being tested, that concentrates more on topography than urban exploration. The Marmota mobile AR can tell you things like what the names of those mountain peaks over there are, what their elevation is, and how far away they are. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Nikon unveils new Coolpix with built-in projector

By - August 19, 2010 10 Pictures
So you need to show off your latest holiday snaps or home movie to your friends and family, and don't have a digital photo frame, tablet computer or laptop anywhere nearby. What you need is a camera that can throw images onto a nearby wall. Happily, Nikon has announced that it has upgraded its projector-wielding Coolpix compact. There are more megapixels, high definition movie capabilities and an even brighter projector, as well as a body redesign and new color options. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Fujifilm W3: world's first compact camera capable of shooting 3D high definition video

By - August 19, 2010 10 Pictures
It's been just over a year since Fujifilm went three dimensional with the release of its FinePix Real 3D camera, the W1. Now the company has announced its second 3D compact camera, the Finepix REAL 3D W3. Although it inherits some of the feature set from its predecessor, the W3 gets a larger LCD display and now records video in high definition, albeit at 720p. Fujifilm has also thrown in stereo sound recording for good measure. Read More
— Marine

Jumping the shark: the Innespace Seabreacher X

By - August 19, 2010 6 Pictures
If you saw this thing on your neighbor's trailer, you'd laugh at him. "What sort of pretentious man-child buys a boat shaped like a shark," you'd scoff into your mugaccino, secure in the knowledge that you'd never shell out for something so ridiculous. But you might change your tune if you caught him down at the lake and watched him pulling 50mph (80km/h) barrel rolls, then diving under the surface and launching the thing 12-feet (3.6m) into the air like some sort of evil mechanical dolphin. The Seabreacher X is preposterous in theory, but in practice it's an adrenaline machine that can do things pretty much no other watercraft can – take a look at the video after the jump. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Ricoh announces CX4 compact digital superzoom

By - August 18, 2010 16 Pictures
Ricoh has announced a successor to its popular CX3 compact superzoom which sports a new body design, tracking auto-focus and improved image stabilization. Described by the company as "workmanlike yet stylish", the 10 megapixel CX4 retains its predecessor's high resolution LCD display, wide-angle optical zoom lens and 720p video capability but now benefits from improved noise reduction and a special night landscape mode. Read More
— Automotive

Researchers develop new thermoplastic fiber composite material to build safer cars

By - August 18, 2010
Vehicles used to be predominantly made of steel, but to reduce weight and cost today’s vehicles are now built from a mixture of materials including steels, aluminum and fiber-reinforced plastics. Highly stressed load-bearing structures and crash components constructed from composites are designed to buckle on impact to help reinforce the body and protect the vehicle‘s occupants in the event of a collision. But these materials tend to chip into sharp-edged splinters on impact. Researchers have now found a way for the automotive industry to mass-produce a particularly safe class of materials that can absorb the enormous forces generated in a collision without splintering. Read More
— Laptops

Cleverly designed laptop stands save your back

By - August 18, 2010 17 Pictures
Laptop computers are appropriately named, as they do sit nicely on your lap. If you’ve ever tried using one down there, however, you’ll know that it’s not the most ergonomic set-up imaginable – you have to bend your head down, keep your knees up, and feel your thighs getting toasty warm from the computer-generated heat that is evidently not able to disperse into the air. In order to position laptops in other ways, various companies have offered laptop stands to put on your desk, devices for turning your lap itself into a desk-like computer workspace, gizmos that allow you to swivel your laptop over from the passenger seat of your car, or that let you use it beside your bed. If only there was one that held your laptop in front of you while you were lying on your back... there is, of course, and Hong Kong-based company Omax has a variety of them to choose from. Read More
— Electronics

Researchers develop ultrahigh-power energy storage “micro-supercapacitor”

By - August 18, 2010
Supercapacitors, also called electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) or ultracapacitors, are electrochemical capacitors that have an unusually high energy density when compared to common capacitors. They bridge the gap between batteries, which offer high energy densities but are slow, and “conventional” electrolytic capacitors, which are fast but have low energy densities. An international team of researchers are reporting the development of a mirco-supercapacitor with remarkable properties that has the potential to power mobile electronics, wireless sensor networks, biomedical implants, RFID tags and embedded microsensors, among other devices. Read More
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