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— Automotive

Unique air shutter helps Chevrolet Cruze achieve 40mpg fuel efficiency

By - August 16, 2010 3 Pictures
The Honda Civic hybrid gets approximately 45 mpg on the highway, while the similarly-sized 2011 Chevrolet Cruze Eco gets 40 mpg. That's pretty decent on the Chevy’s part, considering it isn’t even a hybrid. Of course, because it isn’t a hybrid, that means it doesn’t sport a hybrid’s price tag - the Cruze Eco will start at $US18,895, as opposed to the Honda’s $23,800. So, how is it possible for a combustion-engined car to almost match a hybrid’s fuel efficiency? Well, lowering the weight and the ride height help a bit, but according to Chevrolet, the real reason lies in the car’s unique front air shutter system. Read More
— Medical

Nanoscale coating for surgical equipment and hospital surfaces safely kills MRSA

By - August 16, 2010 2 Pictures
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the bacteria responsible for antibiotic resistant infections, poses a serious problem in hospitals, where patients with open wounds, invasive devices and weakened immune systems are at greater risk of infection than the general public. In a move that could significantly reduce this risk, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a nanoscale coating for surgical equipment, hospital walls, and other surfaces which safely eradicates MRSA. Read More
— Science

Scientists create a multitool for working with nanoparticles

By - August 16, 2010 2 Pictures
If you had to sort a bunch of nanoparticles by size, what would you use? A microscope, tweezers, and a very finely-calibrated caliper? Actually, you’d probably use the nanofluidic “multi-tool” created by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the US. Before you start picturing a teeny-tiny Leatherman, which would admittedly be pretty cool, you should be aware that the NIST device is more like a coin separator, that sorts your nickels, dimes and quarters. In this case, however, they would be nickels, dimes and quarters that are smaller than a bacterium. Read More
— Aircraft

Global Observer successfully completes first flight

By - August 16, 2010 4 Pictures
After AeroVironment’s recent announcement that its Global Observer unmanned aircraft system (UAS) had successfully completed a series of Wing Load tests the team apparently wasted no time getting the craft in the air for its maiden flight. On August 5 Global Observer 1001 took off from Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in California and climbed to an altitude of 4,000 feet where it performed a series of maneuvers before landing successfully one hour later. Read More
— Science

Researchers use rocket science for sustainable waste treatment process

By - August 16, 2010 2 Pictures
Rocket engines are generally not thought of as being environmentally-friendly, but thanks to a newly-developed process, we may someday see them neutralizing the emissions from wastewater treatment plants. The same process would also see those plants generating their own power, thus meaning they would be both energy-neutral and emissions-free. Developed by two engineers at Stanford University, the system starts with the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane gas - something that treatment plants traditionally try to avoid. Read More
— Outdoors

The versatile VQ3000 portable satellite dish

By - August 16, 2010
When I think of camping I think of open starry skies, the sound of crickets humming in the warm summer night, talking with friends and family around the camp fire and leaving the madness of the city behind. If however, your style of camping involves dragging as many creature comforts as possible with you, the VuQube VQ3000 could well be on your wish-list. Billed as the first fully automatic, light-weight, self-contained, portable satellite system with in-motion capability, the VQ3000 promises uninterrupted satellite TV reception wherever you roam. Read More
— Laptops

Dell releases lightweight 11.6-inch Inspiron M101z laptop

By - August 16, 2010 6 Pictures
The Inspiron M101z 11.6-inch laptop from Dell has netbook-like dimensions and weighs less than four pounds yet sports a fast Athlon processor, a couple of gigabytes of memory and a good-sized hard disk drive. There's also the promise of over six and a half hours battery life from its standard 6-cell battery, a full-width keyboard, Bluetooth 3.0 and Wireless N connectivity and a USB port that can be used to power connected devices, even when the laptop is not switched on. Read More
— Science

New method to predict how nanoparticles will react in the human body

By - August 16, 2010
At the nanoscale chemistry is different and nanoparticles don’t behave like normal particles. Nanoparticles tend to be more chemically reactive than ordinary-sized particles of the same material, making it hard to predict how they will act under different conditions and raising serious questions about the use of such particles – particularly inside the human body. Researchers have now developed a method for predicting the ways nanoparticles will interact with biological systems – including the human body – that could improve human and environmental safety in the handling on nanomaterials, and have applications for drug delivery. Read More
— Laptops

iXP1-500 adapter solves iPad USB charging issues

By - August 16, 2010
Some iPad owners may have had some difficulties charging their device via USB on non-Apple PCs with even some older Apple computers having problems in this area as well. Apple is reportedly working with third party PC manufacturers to address the problem and several PC motherboard manufacturers have released new drivers that will allow iPad charging from a PC. If you’re still having problems though, there’s now a cheap and compact solution in the form of the iXP1-500 iPad adapter. Read More
— Home Entertainment

New 3D technology looks to the past to overcome the problems of present systems

By - August 15, 2010 2 Pictures
With the advent of 3D glasses with polarizing filters and LCD shutters you’d be forgiven for thinking we’d seen the last of the archetypal numbers with different colored filters. Well, think again because European researchers have come up with technology they say can display 3D images at a monitor’s full resolution, with no darkening of the ambient light, no restrictions on viewing angle and with less strain on the eyes than other 3D technologies – and yes, it relies on glasses with different colored filters. Read More
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