more top stories »
— Science

Salmonella bacteria used to stop viruses

Generally speaking, it is inadvisable to eat foods containing Salmonella bacteria – especially if you’re not a fan of diarrhea, fever or abdominal cramps. In the future, however, we might be swallowing genetically-engineered versions of the little guys as a way of treating viral infections. If we do, it will be thanks to research presently being carried out at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health. Scientists there have reprogrammed Salmonella bacteria to act as harmless transporters of virus-stopping enzymes. Read More
— Automotive

Nissan to show production-ready ESFLOW electric sports car in Geneva

With a track record including the time-honored Z series and the extraordinary GT-R supercar, Nissan’s credentials for producing affordable sports car exotica is without equal – which makes the company’s latest showing even more exciting. Nissan will use the Geneva Motor Show to debut an electric sports car based closely on technology pioneered in the production Nissan LEAF. The ESFLOW is a two-seater with its two electric motors each driving a rear wheel. It will hit 100km/h in under five seconds and run 240kms between powerpoints. Read More
— Bicycles

StreetFlyer: hang-gliding on three-wheels

If the notion of flying through the air appeals then hang-gliding might be your first thought. But if your fear of heights keeps you closer to the ground then perhaps Dr Carsten Mehring's StreetFlyer may be of interest. The human-powered three-wheeler suspends its user from an arched frame so that when enough momentum is generated, the legs can be lifted off the ground and you're away – at a cruising altitude of just a few feet. Read More
— Electronics

New graphene transistor created with record high-switching performance

Graphene has already brought us the world’s smallest transistor, a triple-mode, single transistor amplifier and a supercapacitor that can store as much energy as a battery while recharging in seconds. And these are sure to just be the tip of the iceberg. The latest breakthrough from the wonderful world of graphene is a new graphene field effect transistor (GFET) that boasts a record high-switching performance. The device promises improved performance for future electronic devices and means graphene could potentially replace silicon, or at least be used side by side with silicon, in electronic devices. Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People plans to buy satellite and provide free Internet access for entire world

For those of us who live in the developed world, internet access has become pretty much a given. It’s become so ubiquitous that we almost expect to have it at all times and in all places, but even in this “Information Age,” the majority of the world’s population lacks access to the internet – either because service isn’t available where they are, or they can’t afford it. Kosta Grammatis has a plan, however. Through his charity group, Grammatis aims to set up a network of satellites that will provide free internet access to everyone in the world. He’s starting by attempting to buy a single used satellite that’s already in orbit and moving it to a location above a developing country. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Vogel’s RingO Universal iPad mounting system

Although iPads are designed to be carried around, that doesn’t mean you necessarily want to be literally carrying the iPad all the time – even when you’re using it. Hence the huge variety of iPad mounts on the market. While most of the mounting solutions on offer generally aim for one or maybe two specific uses, such as in the car, on the fridge or in the studio, Vogel’s RingO Universal Mounting System is designed to let users mount their iPad just about anywhere. Read More
— Mobile Technology

See double with the Kyocera Echo dual-screen smartphone

For smartphone manufacturers, getting the display size right can be a bit of a balancing act. People want a screen that is big enough for doing things like composing and reading emails and viewing pictures, but they also want a device that fits comfortably in their pocket. To offer the maximum screen real estate while retaining the compact size of a smartphone, Kyocera has taken a leaf out of Nintendo’s book and come up with a dual touchscreen smartphone that offers multitasking capabilities called the Echo. Read More
— Aircraft

X-47B first flight: the era of the autonomous unmanned combat plane approaches

No matter how I look at this, it still seems like science fiction – a combat aircraft without a pilot that is capable of flying itself, making its own decisions, recognizing and neutralizing threats, and taking off and landing on an aircraft carrier. Last Friday (Feb 4), the Northrop Grumman-built U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) aircraft successfully completed its historic first flight at Edwards Air Force Base in California. The era of the unmanned combat plane is fast approaching. Read More
— Marine

Production set to begin on Loon solar-electric boat

Five years ago we first reported on Tamarack Lake Electric Boat Company's Loon, a proposed production solar-electric boat. At that time, creator Monte Gisborne told us that “exhausting hydrocarbons directly into your own lake isn’t much different from urinating in your family room.” In 2009 the 8-passenger watercraft received a design overhaul, and production was scheduled to begin later that year. Now, with a just-announced deal in place to manufacture the boat at facilities in the city of Rome, New York, full-scale Loon production should finally be commencing within the next few months. Read More