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3D is the big news in the world of TV this year and now even cell cultures are getting in on the act. A team of scientists has taken aim at a biological icon - the two-dimensional petri dish – and unveiled a new technique for growing 3D cell cultures. The new process uses magnetic forces to levitate cells while they divide and grow to form tissues that more closely resemble those inside the human body. This represents a technological leap from the flat petri dish and could save millions of dollars in drug-testing costs. Read More
We recently looked at a breakthrough in using sunlight to create hydrogen but now scientists have found a way to use ambient noise to turn water into usable hydrogen fuel. The process harvests small amounts of otherwise-wasted energy such as noise or stray vibrations from the environment to break the chemical bonds in water and produce oxygen and hydrogen gas. Read More
One of the benefits of a flat panel TV is the small amount of space it takes up depth-wise compared to CRT TVs. But many viewers don’t take advantage of the extra space saving and sleek look because they are put off from having to purchase an expensive mount and installing it on their walls. Well, what if installing a flat panel TV – up to 50kg – was as easy as hanging a picture? Read More
MSI has announced U.S. availability of its Wind U160 ten-inch netbook which is less than an inch thick and is claimed to squeeze some 15 hours from its 6-cell battery. The netbook also offers smooth action video rendering thanks to an 8ms response time, 802.11n WiFi and is only MSI's second product to feature Intel's energy efficient Pine Trail Atom N450 processor. Read More
We've all seen mesmerizing footage of the sun's fiery surface as it bubbles and seethes at 6.5 million degrees, but now we can hear it! Researchers from University of Michigan and a composer from Alumnus School of Music have interpreted the sun's solar wind into music by a process called sonification. This has allowed them to understand events happening the sun in a whole new way. Read More
For the past 18 years, the cop car of choice for North American police forces has been a modified version of the Ford Crown Victoria. And here’s an interesting fact about the Crown Vic: it hasn’t been available to the general public since 2008. Here’s another: it looks like something your grandpa would drive. While police forces like the cars because of their V8 engines, rear-wheel-drive, and easy-to-repair body-on-frame construction, they have become aesthetically and technologically dated. It’s time for a change, so the Ford Motor Company is offering one - last Friday, they revealed a new purpose-built Police Interceptor, which will take over when the Crown Victoria goes out of production in late 2011. The Ford Taurus-based sedan is said to exceed the durability, safety, performance and fuel economy of the Crown Vic. Read More
The Guitarbud from the cable arm of guitar manufacturers Paul Reed Smith Guitars allows you to plug a guitar directly into an iPhone or iPod Touch, slap on a pair of headphones and use the multitude of guitar apps available to record your magical moments of inventive creativity, tune up your six-stringed companion, jam along to your favorite artists or capture a killer riff and send it to your friends. Read More
Cancer is a disease whose treatments are notoriously indiscriminate and nonspecific. Researchers have been searching for a highly targeted medical treatment that attacks cancer cells but leaves healthy tissue alone. A team of scientists at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) is working on gold nanocages that, when injected, selectively accumulate in tumors. When the tumors are later bathed in laser light, the surrounding tissue is barely warmed, but the nanocages convert light to heat, killing the malignant cells. Read More
I suppose 'camerawomen' would be more appropriate, given that Athena is a woman's name. But what's in a name? Regardless of what you call it Gitzo's fully electronic, remote-controlled head was one of the sweetest gadgets on display at CP+ 2010 Focus on Imaging exhibition in Yohohama this past weekend. Read More
Today watches are built to withstand varying degrees of water pressure and shocks and scrapes of all sorts. But a new watch from Seiko has been built to withstand the harsh environments found when the wearer is enjoying a pleasant Sunday afternoon spacewalk. Touted as the first watch ever designed for use in outer space might restrict the target market for the Seiko Spring Drive Spacewalk watch somewhat, which is probably why Seiko will release a limited edition of only 100. Read More
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