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— Digital Cameras

Sony announces diminutive NEX-5 and NEX-3 interchangeable lens cameras

By - May 12, 2010 9 Pictures
Cameras that combine DSLR functionality and the convenience of interchangeable lenses with a compact footprint have become the new wave in recent times, with the likes of the Olympus EP-1, Panasonic Lumix G2 and Ricoh GXR hitting the market. Now Sony has announced two diminutive additions to its Alpha line of digital SLRs - the NEX-5 and NEX-3. While the NEX-5 - which claims the current title of the world’s smallest and lightest interchangeable lens digital camera - is leading Sony's drive into this space, both units feature impressive credentials including a newly-developed 14.2 effective megapixel CMOS sensor, high-speed burst shooting of up to 7fps at full-resolution and, in a first for the Alpha line, a Sweep Panorama mode with 3D compatibility and HD video recording. Read More
— Bicycles

Ferris WheeLED keeps you simultaneously safe and stylin'

By - May 12, 2010 8 Pictures
Most cyclists will attach some form of light or reflector to their bicycles when riding at night, but Japanese company PIAA has created a light that's pretty mesmerizing to look at as well. By attaching the Ferris WheeLED to your wheel spokes, you transform your bike into a veritable mobile light show. Twelve different design patterns can be created as a result of varying flash sequences. Read More
— Bicycles

Suit Commute lets you ride to work and arrive 'wrinkle-free'

By - May 12, 2010 9 Pictures
Trying to do the right thing by the environment and ride a scooter or bicycle to work is great – unless you have to wear a suit. Wear it riding and you can sometimes look like the “great unwashed” by the time you arrive at your desk. Place it carefully into a backpack and by the time you’re unpacking it, it looks like you ironed it with the leg of a chair. The Suit Commute, however, is designed to hold your neatly pressed suit and shirt in place so you arrive for the board meeting or job interview looking fit for the part (just don’t forget to fix your “helmet hair”). Read More
— Digital Cameras

Ricoh P10 zoom unit for GXR system set for June release

By - May 12, 2010 5 Pictures
As promised earlier this year, Ricoh has now unveiled the development and release of its third lens module for its GXR digital camera system. The P10 28-300 mm F3.5-5.6 VC wide angle 10.7x zoom lens module has been optimized for high quality output and benefits from revised image processing algorithms. It can continuously shoot at up to five frames per second in RAW format but up to 120 in VGA and can record movies in 720p high definition. Read More
— Telecommunications

Universal 4Mbps broadband comes with a US$23.5 billion price tag

By - May 12, 2010 1 Picture
The developed world is fast heading towards a globally networked information economy. Any government that fails to recognize that high-speed Internet access is fundamental to future economic growth and prosperity runs the risk of quickly ending up on the wrong end of a digital divide. While this applies to countries as a whole it also apples to residents within a country, with some spoiled for choice when it comes to broadband access while others in more remotes areas are left wanting. In a bid to ensure broadband access to all people in the U.S., the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has set a 4Mbps download target for universal broadband with its National Broadband Plan. The undertaking will cost US$23.5 billion. Read More
— Automotive

Mazda's frugal 55mpg 4WD commuter

By - May 11, 2010 1 Picture
We know that the grass is always greener on the other side… but do the cars also have to be greener elsewhere too? Mazda's Carol micro-mini is only available in Japan yet its excellent fuel economy, affordability and specifications read like a wish list for commuters the world over - 4WD, 55 mpg, CVT, keyless entry, keyless start system, immobilizer, DOHC VVT motor, four-wheel ABS, electronic brake distribution (EBD), brake assist, split folding rear seats, heated seats… there's even wing mirror heaters to prevent fogging on cold mornings. Read More
— Science

Wonder why we don't crash like computers? Yale explains

By - May 11, 2010 1 Picture
Whether right or for wrong, the human brain is often compared to a computer, and vice-versa. They both receive data, process it, store it, and output new data. Unlike computers, however, the human brain doesn’t crash. Yes, people have nervous breakdowns, but that has more to do with psychological stress than with data management. Now, researchers from Yale University have figured out why our brains succeed where computers fail. Read More
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