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— Aircraft

The Air Deck: a balcony for your private jet

By - May 10, 2010 5 Pictures
BAE Systems has partnered with luxury transport design consultancy firm Design Q to develop an "Air Deck" viewing platform concept for BAE’s Avro Business Jet (ABJ). Aimed at jet setters that like heading off the beaten flight path, the Air Deck transforms the rear of the aircraft into an extended living space by way of an elevated outdoor viewing deck. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Sony's 3G VAIO P: accelerometer, digital compass and stand-up controls

By - May 10, 2010 14 Pictures
With so many variations of smartphones, netbooks, and tablet PCs on the market it's hard to imagine the categories of mobile tech getting more confusing - but they are. Sony has just thrown another unclassifiable beast into the mix with its new VAIO P Series. The first Type P had a sexy and ultra-portable form factor that could be stuffed into one of your larger pockets and while this new Type P might not be a game changer, it certainly has a boat-load of mobile-friendly features. Read More
— Home Entertainment

Fancy a US$30,000 bottle of Whisky?

By - May 10, 2010 4 Pictures
Whisky may not be everyone's idea of a sound financial investment, but as we have reported previously, as long as you choose wisely and resist drinking it, IT IS! With that in mind, you may wish to consider an exceptionally rare bottle of Glenfiddich coming up for auction next month. It is one of only 61 bottles produced by the distillery in 1937 and is the first to appear at auction. Having matured for 64 years it is also one of the oldest whiskies ever released and is expected to fetch between GBP15,000 - 20,000 (US$22,250 – 29,670). Read More
— Science

New metamaterial could lead to more efficient solar cells

By - May 10, 2010 1 Picture
Metamaterials are manmade substances designed to do some very weird things that natural materials don’t. The path of a beam of light through a natural material like glass is predictable, but scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have engineered an optical material that bends light in the wrong direction. This new negative-index metamaterial (NIM) could have several valuable uses including invisibility cloaking, superlensing (imaging nano-scale objects using visible light) and improved light collection in solar cells. Read More
— Music

Sleek Audio SA7 - world's fanciest set of earbuds?

By - May 10, 2010 3 Pictures
Back in August 2007, we told you about Sleek Audio’s SA6 in-ear headphone system. It featured adjustable bass and treble, interchangeable ear tips, replaceable cables... oh yeah, and it cost $US250. Not exactly your $5 drug store system. Well, the SA6 is still around, but it’s about to lose its title of World’s Fanciest Earbud. Later this year, Sleek Audio will be rolling out the carbon fiber/aluminum/titanium SA7. Read More
— Music

It's Tight like that: Amptweaker's TightDrive Overdrive/Tone pedal

By - May 10, 2010 5 Pictures
The TightDrive from Amptweaker allows guitar and bass players to take control of that all important tone and overcome any unwanted delay that can slow down the sound as it moves through an amp's circuitry. As well as LED-lit gain, distortion, volume and Tight controls the pedal also features an effects loop where onboard effects can be moved in front of or behind the TightDrive's tone modifications. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Battlefield injuries could be treated with light

By - May 10, 2010 2 Pictures
There are quite a few bits of “future tech” in the various Star Trek series that are a little hard to believe, and the device their medics use for treating cuts is definitely one of them... they just shine the gizmo on a wound, and it instantly heals up. C’mon, that could never work! Or could it? The US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) is now developing technology that could treat airmen’s battlefield injuries with - you guessed it - light. What’s next, replicator-made Klingon food? Read More
— Computers

NEC announces new technology to detect pirated videos online

By - May 10, 2010 1 Picture
NEC Japan has fired the latest salvo in war between pirates and video producers with the announcement of new identification technology capable of detecting copies of videos illegally uploaded to the Internet in a matter of seconds. According to NEC the technology achieved an average detection rate of 96 percent at a very low false alarm rate of 5ppm (5 in one million). It is also capable of detecting altered video content, such as caption overlays, camera captured copies and analog copies. Read More
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