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— Science

Color-changing electrochromic lens technology has fashion and military applications

Most will be familiar with photochromic lenses that darken when exposed to UV light, but now a researcher at the University of Connecticut has developed lenses that can quickly switch color based on the amount of voltage passed through them. While sunglasses manufacturers are expected to employ the technology to create color-changing sunglasses, it has also apparently captured the attention of the U.S. military who see it as a way to potentially assist soldiers to see clearly in rapidly changing environments. Read More
— Motorcycles

Husqvarna Nuda streetbike available THIS YEAR

If there was any doubt that the journeyman Husqvarna brand had found a permanent home, or would be reinvigorated by BMW ownership, those doubts were dispelled during the recent BMW Innovations Day program in Munich when the wraps were pulled off the new NUDA 900 R streetbike. If last year's Mille3 concept shown at EICMA hadn't pointed the way towards Husqy returning to the roads, the Nuda is a concrete design landmark that leaves no doubt about the future of a BMW Motorrad sister brand. The equation is simple: 100+ bhp with a meaty 100 Nm of torque, all in a package weighing 175 kg (386 lb) sans liquids. Read More
— Motorcycles

Video: BMW evaluates electric E-Scooter

BMW has flagged a possible intention to get into the electric motorcycle market with the airing of its E-Scooter concept bike. Designed from the ground up as an electric bike, the E-scooter uses its battery casing as a primary component of the frame. With a regenerative braking system built in and a full charge from a conventional power socket taking less than three hours, the E-Scooter is capable of over 100km per charge, and easily makes freeway speeds. Read More
— Around The Home

FireText Smoke Alarm texts you in the event of a fire

Smoke alarms are great for alerting people that a fire has broken out so they can get out of harm’s way and alert the authorities. But what happens if there’s no one home when a fire breaks out. Sure, you could rely on your neighbors to raise the alarm, but by that point your house and its precious contents will likely be well ablaze. The FireText Smoke Alarm will let you know if your house is going up in smoke wherever you may be by sending a text message to up to four mobile phone numbers as soon as it detects smoke. Read More
— Good Thinking

Final space shuttle mission testing system to turn urine into a sports drink

Atlantis may have taken off on the last ever space shuttle mission last week but that doesn’t mean it has finished racking up firsts. Along with ferrying its last batch of supplies to the International Space Station (ISS), Atlantis is also carrying a urine recycling system that is designed to convert astronaut’s urine into a sports drink. The Forward Osmosis Bag (FOB) system will reportedly be tested by one of the four-man crew towards the end of the shuttle’s 12-day mission. Read More
— Science

Billion-pixel camera to map the Milky Way

At approximately one billion pixels, it’s the largest digital camera ever built for a space mission. Over a five-year period, the “billion-pixel array” will be used aboard the European Space Agency’s Gaia spacecraft, to map upwards of a billion stars. While it will be focusing mainly on our own Milky Way galaxy, Gaia will also be mapping other celestial bodies, including galaxies and quasars near the edge of the observable universe. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Rollei Bullet HD actioncam shoots video, not ammo

Before current technology allowed them to be available to the public, wearable POV (point-of-view) video cameras were known within the television industry as “bullet cameras,” because of their shape. Nowadays, they come in all shapes, sizes and price ranges, and are generally called actioncams or helmetcams. Hearkening back to the days of yore, however, is Rollei’s recently-released Bullet HD. With its aluminum body and rounded nose, it does indeed look like a big bullet ... or perhaps a small Thermos flask. Read More
— Automotive

Cheaper vehicle sensory system developed

There are presently several in-car systems that use small cameras and sensors to alert drivers to dangers on the road, or even in their own driving habits. Some of these systems can be quite costly, and are therefore limited to use in fairly expensive automobiles. Now, however, a team of scientists from Germany's Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration have developed a new type of sensory system, that's cheap enough to produce that it could be used in economy vehicles. Read More
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