Advertisement
more top stories »
— Mobile Technology

Toshiba unveils Folio 100 media tablet at IFA

By - September 3, 2010 15 Pictures
Toshiba Europe has chosen the IFA consumer electronics show to unveil its 10.1-inch Android media tablet powered by NVIDIA's Tegra II processor. The Folio 100 features an onboard camera, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth (with a 3G model in the pipeline) and a HDMI port for viewing content on a big screen television. The company has also announced the development of an one-stop portal to access and share online content over numerous device formats. We couldn't resist the opportunity to take a closer look. Read More
— Music

New amps and effects units outed by Roland

By - September 3, 2010 17 Pictures
With over a million sales notched up, Roland has announced that the next generation of Cube amplifiers is ready to be let loose. The Cube XL series is available in four sizes, starting at the practice 15W version right up to a gig-worthy 80W model. The amps all feature a host of tones and effects and an auxiliary input to allow a portable music player to provide backing tracks. Features on offer from the new range include amp modeling, channel-switching and a strange-sounding power squeeze function. Roland has also unleashed a couple of BOSS guitar effects pedals – one that offers the player pitch control and voice harmony possibilities and the other squeezing some tube amp sounds into a palm-sized stomp box. Read More
— Medical

Near infrared light to help researchers hunt for cancers

By - September 3, 2010
Cancer is an insidious disease, paying no heed to when, where or whom it might strike. But scientists continue to wage a war against it, hoping to claim the ultimate prize – a cure. Latest research from chemists at the University of Florida suggests a new technique using near infrared light could help scientists to view and photograph lysosomes – sac-like structures within cells – that are linked to cancer and other diseases. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Researchers unveil prototype implantable artificial kidney to replace dialysis

By - September 3, 2010 3 Pictures
End-stage renal disease, or chronic kidney failure, affects more than 500,000 people per year in the U.S. alone, and currently is only fully treated with a kidney transplant. That number has been rising between five to seven percent per year and with just 17,000 donated kidneys available for transplant last year the waiting list currently exceeds 85,000, according to the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network. Those who can’t secure a kidney for transplant are left reliant on kidney dialysis. An expensive and time consuming process that typically requires three sessions per week, for three to five hours per session, in which blood is pumped through an external circuit for filtration. In a development that could one day eliminate the need for dialysis, researchers have unveiled a prototype model of the first implantable artificial kidney. Read More
— Automotive

All-electric Ford Focus to use liquid cooled/heated lithium-ion battery system

By - September 2, 2010
One of the downsides of the lithium-ion battery systems used in electric vehicles is that their performance, reliability, safety and durability can be negatively affected by extreme temperatures. When the all-new Ford Focus Electric debuts later this year in the U.S. it will be powered by a lithium-ion battery – no news there. What is interesting, however, is that the battery system will use cooled and heated liquid to regulate battery temperature, which should extend battery life and maximize driving range. Read More
— Computers

Immersion's new haptic effects solution heads for Toshiba's Libretto w100

By - September 2, 2010 2 Pictures
Are you the sort of person who loves touch screen technology but yearns for the mechanical feel and security of a real keyboard? You may be interested to hear that Toshiba’s Libretto w100 dual touch-screen mini notebook will be the first device to hit the market that incorporates Immersion Corporation’s TouchSense 2500 solution that provides touch feedback effects when hitting keys. The haptic effects help to minimize the chance of mis-keying, provide immediate tactile response and allow you to get all touchy and feely at the same time. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Sun, dust, music, desert and a free solar powered cellular network

By - September 2, 2010 3 Pictures
Burning Man, the popular desert music festival, is this year featuring a free, solar powered cellular network for the duration of the festival which winds up on Monday. The open source software, OpenBTS (Open Base Transceiver Station) is a low-cost replacement for traditional cell networks. It allows mobile phones to connect to each other if they're all within range of the transceiver, or to connect with any other phones with Internet connection. It utilizes a Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP) to create a GSM air interface on any standard GSM mobile phone. The founders of Burning Man, which began this week in Black Rock City, Nevada, have decided to trial the system by allowing the 50,000 or so attendees free access to the network. Read More
— Good Thinking

New tech allows 'memory materials' to store multiple memorized shapes

By - September 2, 2010
They’re known as smart materials, memory materials or shape memory alloys, but it all boils down to the same thing: materials that hold one shape, but then take on another at a certain temperature. Such substances have been around for decades, but now researchers at Canada’s University of Waterloo have taken them to a new level. Using a patent-pending process, they can embed multiple shape memories in one object – in other words, while memory materials can presently take on only two shapes, going from one to the other at just one temperature, using the new process they could take on several shapes at several temperatures. The Multiple Memory Material Technology (MMMT) is said to work with virtually any memory material. Read More
— Mobile Technology

The Rydeen GCOM701 tablet/GPS navigation hybrid device

By - September 2, 2010
Integrated silicon solutions company, Marvell along with Rydeen Mobile Electronics have announced the Rydeen GCOM701, a new Android™ tablet. The GCOM701 features built-in Wi-Fi, GPS, Bluetooth capability, removable memory, a front-facing camera and easy connectivity for jump drives, along with an internal microphone and speaker, enabling the use of Internet-based communications services such as Skype. A 7 inch TFT touch panel with 800x480 pixel resolution, which also provides ability to surf the web, read e-books and view photos or videos. Whilst on the road, the GCOM701 functions as a portable navigation device, including four million points of interest. The 7.4 volt battery provides considerable standby time and 6 hours of operational time. Read More
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement