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— Health and Wellbeing

Researchers create hair cells - cure for deafness on the way?

By - May 18, 2010 1 Picture
It’s become an accepted fact of life that people tend to lose much of their hearing as they get old. This is because our hair cells, the cells in our ears which allow us to hear, cannot regenerate - we’re born with 30,000 per ear, but once they die off or get damaged, they’re gone for good. Stefan Heller, a professor of otolaryngology (ear, nose and throat stuff) at Stanford University, wants to change that. To that end, he recently succeeded in creating mouse hair cells in a petri dish. Could an end to deafness be far behind? Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Release office tension with the USB Stress Ball

By - May 18, 2010 2 Pictures
Stress balls are a great way to relieve tension and help combat repetitive strain injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome. They’re also an easy answer for office workers looking for a gift when social convention states you need to get a little something for someone you work with, but don’t really know that well. Since no gift is complete nowadays unless it comes with a USB cable dangling from it, this tech-take on the stress ball could be the answer. The USB Stress Ball not only provides some physical stress relief, but some virtual stress relief as well. Read More
— Good Thinking

Novel process lifts fingerprints based on geometry, not chemistry

By - May 18, 2010 1 Picture
If shows like CSI have taught us anything about lifting fingerprints, it’s that we do it by dusting them with powder or fuming them with chemicals... and that we have to turn on blue accent lighting and play moody electronic music while we’re doing it. Approaches like these rely on chemical reactions with the deposited finger skin oil to provide the print. A new method developed at Penn State University, however, lets the physical geometry of the print do the talking. The oils are left unaltered, which could make all the difference in a criminal investigation. Read More
— Good Thinking

Schooling fish inspire new approach to wind farming

By - May 18, 2010 2 Pictures
Schooling fish, it turns out, have a lot to teach us about setting up wind farms. That’s the conclusion reached by John Dabiri, a fluid dynamics expert from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). One of the biggest current problems with wind farms is the large land area that they require - if you place the turbines too close to one another, they will be adversely effected by each other’s turbulence. By applying principles learned from observing fish, however, Dabiri thinks he might have found a solution. Read More
— Computers

HP joins Team AMD for release of more than a dozen notebooks

By - May 18, 2010 3 Pictures
HP has boosted its range of laptops quite substantially, with its largest single introduction of AMD-powered notebook PCs to date. Fourteen new machines are on offer in total, pitched towards both business customers and home users. All of the models in HP’s new notebook range include updated AMD multicore processors. Among the new brood is a set of Phenom II Dual-Core N620 systems promising to offer users up to 69 per cent faster performance than previous models. Read More
— Computers

Back to back with the Bi Computing concept

By - May 18, 2010 8 Pictures
Pauley Interactive's Bi Computing concept looks to provide "the perfect platform for gamers, Internet surfers, business applications or watching TV and movies all at the same time, in the same place." The design crunches a couple of computers into one unit with back to back displays, an idea that could help ease the battle for space in homes and offices positively overflowing with gadgets and gizmos. Read More
— Automotive

The world's most coveted automobile finds a new home

By - May 18, 2010 8 Pictures
RM Auctions believes it has just sold the world’s most coveted car - a rare 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO. The marque (chassis no. 4675 GT), in unmistakable Ferrari red and with the prancing horses emblazoned on the hood, has an excellent pedigree. One of only 36 250 GTOs originally produced in 1962/63 and one of a limited few with Series II GTO bodywork, it left the factory in April 1963 and was subsequently raced by Guido Fossati, Jean Guichet, Oddone Sigala, Vincenzo Nember and Luigi Taramazzo, rarely finishing outside the top three in its class and achieving numerous race wins. Read More
— Mobile Technology

HP Labs geo-tagging experiment is good to Gloe

By - May 18, 2010 1 Picture
With increasing numbers of people accessing the Internet on mobile devices there is a call for a quick, easy way to sort locally relevant content from the mountain of online data. To address this need HP is dipping its toes in the geo-tagging waters with Gloe – a concept service that allows users to find, recommend and contribute locally relevant web content on mobile devices. Read More
— Outdoors

Alligator Lopper chows down on trees

By - May 18, 2010 6 Pictures
Black & Decker has a tool that fits comfortably between a chainsaw and a branch lopper. It’s the Alligator Lopper LP1000 and can cut through branches and logs up to four inches thick. It uses its patented scissor action to grab the offending piece of wood, clamps it tight and then powers through it with a 4.5Amp motor driven chainsaw. Read More
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