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Inulin-propionate ester (IPE) could be added to foods, causing them to suppress the consum...

When we get the feeling of "being full," it's because our gut has released hormones that tell our brain to stop being hungry. It would seem to follow, therefore, that people who overeat might benefit from producing greater amounts of those hormones. Well, that's just what an experimental new food additive is claimed to cause the body to do.  Read More

The Ukelation electric ukulele from Monty Ross

Back in 2012, Vox Amplification took the iconic shapes of two 1960s classics, installed speakers and added integrated effects and rhythms to create a new Apache Series of travel guitars. Monty Ross from the state of Washington has now given a four-string beach party regular similar "be heard anywhere" amplified superpowers with a range of electric ukuleles named Ukelation.  Read More

SOMA expects to complete the project in early 2017 (Image: SOMA)

You might think that anyone hoping to erect a large building in a spot currently occupied by a house with protected status would be out of luck. However, developers Zardman and New York's SOMA Architects recently started work on a project that proves otherwise. Bobo is a mixed-use residential building that will dramatically overhang the facade of a protected 1920's-era home in Mar Mikhaël, Beirut.  Read More

The Burj Khalifa's At The Top Sky is the highest observation deck in the world

The Burj Khalifa tower in Dubai is already the tallest building in the world. Now, it also boasts the record for having the highest observation deck of any building. At The Top Sky opened to the public in October and is situated up on the 148th floor of the building, 555 m (1,821 ft) above the ground.  Read More

Brio can tell the difference between a kid's fingers and an electrical appliance

Most of us have a number of power outlets dotted around the house, and each one is a potential hazard to inquisitive little fingers. Brio promises a safer and smarter power outlet that can tell the difference between a kid's fingers and an electrical appliance, only turning on the juice for the latter.  Read More

The deployment of the laser weapon is a first for the US Navy (Photo: US Navy/John F. Will...

The laser goes from the weapon of tomorrow to the weapon of today as the US Navy announces the completion of its successful deployment of the Office of Naval Research's (ONR) Laser Weapon System (LaWS). The deployment is the first on a US Naval vessel and took place on the USS Ponce (LPD-15) in the Arabian Gulf from September to November of this year.  Read More

Researchers have developed a system to uncover compounds capable of turning 'bad' white fa...

Researchers at Harvard University say they have identified two chemical compounds that could replace "bad" fat cells in the human body with healthy fat-burning cells, in what may be the first step toward the development of an effective medical treatment – which could even take the form of a pill – to help control weight gain.  Read More

Gizmag's selection of 2014's most innovative and, in some cases, odd product offerings

The silly season is well and truly upon us again and with it comes the challenge of selecting a suitable gift for tech-loving friends and family. The options are a little overwhelming, but Gizmag's editorial team has sifted through 2014's most innovative and, in some cases, odd product offerings in an effort to help.  Read More

Specially adapted Nintendo Wii games as physiotherapy have led to 'significant' improvemen...

Paralysis or problems controlling movement are among the most common disabilities resulting from stroke and have a major impact on everyday life. Lancaster University researchers say seven out of 10 stroke survivors suffer from arm weakness as a result of their stroke, and only a fifth of these people ever regain the full use of their arm. A new study suggests the Nintendo Wii could provide an effective, economical and fun rehabilitation tool for stroke victims.  Read More

The Hemingwrite does away with the distractions of laptop computers and tablets

For more than a century typewriters were the weapon of choice for professional writers, office workers and those of us with messy handwriting. Then came the age of personal computers complete with the internet and its infinite reel of comical cat videos. A pair of US entrepreneurs believe this has been to the detriment of productivity and are looking to reign things in a little. The Hemingwrite typewriter offers the bare essentials for a writer in the digital age, no email alerts or Youtube recommendations in sight.  Read More

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