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This flexible patch design makes it possible to create a range of bio-integrated devices (...

A team of engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University is developing a stick-on patch that makes health monitoring more flexible and practical. Building on previous work, the latest design replaces custom-made components with off-the-shelf, chip-based electronics to deliver a soft, tattoo-like epidermal electronic system for wireless health monitoring.  Read More

Wilson's Smart Basketball pairs wirelessly with a smartphone app to track training perform...

Tracking shooting success from different areas on the basketball court can provide valuable insights into the strengths and weaknesses of a player, though it usually involves dedicated statisticians to collect and monitor the data. Looking to extend the benefits of these analytics beyond the professional arena is sporting goods manufacturer Wilson, who has announced its Smart Basketball designed to offer detailed feedback on training performance.  Read More

The mini Mustang, ready to take to the air

Although no one is saying that aircraft carriers will soon be able to fuel their jet fighters using water from the ocean, such a scenario has recently come a step closer to reality. Scientists from the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have successfully flown a radio-controlled airplane that was running purely on fuel derived from sea water.  Read More

The da Vinci Xi offers improved access to the patient's body

While many people no doubt still look at Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci robotic surgical system as a sort of "wonder of the future," it's actually been around now for over 10 years. Therefore, it shouldn't come as a surprise that a new-and-improved model has just been announced. Among other things, the da Vinci Xi Surgical System promises a greater range of motion and more reach than its predecessor.  Read More

Multiple Image Resizer .NET allows users to batch resize images and perform other actions

Resizing multiple images can be a time-consuming process. Lots of batch resizing tools, however, are badly designed, drastically reduce image quality or simply aren't supported by their manufacturers any more. Multiple Image Resizer .NET (MIR) avoids all of these pitfalls. Here's a quick look at how to use it.  Read More

The American Institute of Architects has chosen 10 recipients for its 2014 Housing Awards

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has revealed what its judges reckon to be the 10 best new American homes and housing complexes, for the organization's 2014 Housing Awards. Though not explicitly marketed as a list of green housing, almost all of the winners feature some degree of sustainable technology or design.  Read More

Researchers at Newcastle University have utilized Google Glass to help people with Parkins...

Researchers at Newcastle University in the UK have conducted a study into how Google Glass can be used to assist sufferers of Parkinson’s disease. The team is working directly with patients to develop straightforward and useful technology that will help sufferers cope with the disease, while aiding them in becoming more independent.  Read More

The Narrative Clip wearable lifelogging camera

In October 2012, a device called Memoto raised its Kickstarter goal of US$50,000 in under 5 hours and went on to raise over $550,000. Memoto went into production and began shipping in November 2013. Now called Narrative Clip, the device is a wearable lifelogging camera and a smash Kickstarter success. But is it any good? Gizmag got the opportunity to find out.  Read More

The Grush system is designed to make brushing your teeth more enjoyable by incorporating v...

For even the most persuasive of parents, getting the children to form healthy dental habits certainly has its challenges. San Francisco-based start-up Grush is aiming to make the brushing experience a little more appealing by incorporating elements of something much more enjoyable: video games.  Read More

The NIST-F2 loses one second in 300 million years

If you’re someone who is happy to spend an hour setting the clock on the microwave because it has to be just right, then the news out of the US Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is right up your alley. NIST has announced the launch of a new atomic clock as the official standard for civilian time. Called NIST-F2, it is so accurate that it will lose only one second in 300 million years.  Read More

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