Shopping? Check out our latest product comparisons

Music

Connected to a Toshiba laptop at this year's Computex

Call me old fashioned but when I see the comforting glow of a vacuum tube I know that I'm in for some sonic pleasure. And that's precisely the thinking behind the aim AS301DTS USB audio tube headphone amplifier. OK, so the vacuum tube doesn't actually work, it's designed that way to trigger the very mental connection I opened with. That done, the tiny device then promises to deliver bass-enhanced surround sound to just about any pair of headphones attached to it. Sweet.  Read More

Roland's new R-05 pocket recorder is capable of capturing stereo audio at high quality, un...

Most songwriters will agree that when inspiration hits, it's vital to get it down fast. Roland's new MP3/WAV handheld recording device, the R-05, could help capture that magic moment before it slips away forever. Having the ability to record and playback in high quality uncompressed stereo, with onboard editing features and a 16 hour continuous recording battery life, the pocket recorder will obviously appeal to musicians. That said, Roland sees it being useful in non-musical applications, too.  Read More

Sonic Charge Patternarium

I've been a registered owner of Sonic Charge's µTonic (pronounced MicroTonic) drum/percussion synthesizer for years - but a new online tool from Sonic Charge called Patternarium is likely to make it one of my most used plugins when I'm looking for some inspiration in the studio. They're calling it a "giant collaborative patch randomizer," and my explanation of that won't fit in this summary.  Read More

Laser harps make themselves heard in Tokyo

Made famous in concerts by Jean Michel Jarre, laser harps recently gained a boost in popularity after being featured in Make Magazine. That's where one Japanese creator, who goes by the mysterious name of 'nameless911', found inspiration prompting him to make his own for an exhibition at his school. Rick Martin was on the scene to capture this and other Tokyo Make Meeting highlights.  Read More

Scott Garner and his Piano Gloves prototype

Would-be Liberaces could soon be wearing a keyboard on their hands in the form of the Piano Gloves. Created by Scott Garner, the prototype gloves let the wearer play a piano on any surface via buttons on the tips of the fingers. Audio is processed via an Arduino microcontroller wired to the buttons and presently the software can be set to play a major scale or ten semitones, which would limit the gloves to playing tunes comprised of ten or less notes, but Scott is looking at ways to expand the repertoire.  Read More

Frederik Podzuweit has designed a collar that contains resonating membranes to allow the h...

There are times when not being able to hear the wailing caterwaul that sometimes passes for music would be a distinct bonus. On the whole, though, the hearing impaired have it rough where music is concerned. A German designer has proposed incorporating a membrane into a special collar which resonates when music is played through it, allowing people with hearing difficulties to really get down and feel the funk.  Read More

Hollywood's V-MODA brings high fashion to quality audio with the release of the Crossfade ...

Hollywood's V-MODA brings high fashion to quality audio with the release of the Crossfade LP headphones. Users are promised premium audio delivery thanks to an efficient new driver system, a comfortable long-haul experience thanks to memory foam cushioning and a good-looking set of adaptable cans to boot.  Read More

The Zo from digiZoid

At the beginning of May digiZoid introduced the Zo personal subwoofer, which claimed to enhance a listener's sonic experience by offering increasing degrees of bass contouring to any audio fed through it. Over the past week I've had the chance to take the Zo for a spin. Has it lived up to the claims of its manufacturer? Read on for a full review.  Read More

The Uda makes electronic music with a twist

Among the many sounds emanating from the Tokyo Make Meeting 05 this past weekend was the unusually shaped electronic instrument, the Uda. It's played with two hands, and looks like it might be a less-flexible cousin of the accordion. Notes are played by pressing different sections of a rope that's coiled around the device, on both the right and left sides. Exactly where you touch it determines the pitch, and there's a one octave difference between one row of rope and the adjacent row.  Read More

The LinnStrument - a wonderfully expressive digital music interface that may never see the...

The last time most of us heard of Roger Linn, it was when he put his name to the revolutionary Linn LM1 drum machine that became such an integral part of the sound of 1980s pop music - it was used on so many #1 hits that you'll recognize its signature sound straight away. Now, Linn has come up with a new and equally novel tool for musicians - a digital music interface that uses a pressure-sensitive multitouch pad and a layout that combines a piano keyboard with a guitar fretboard. The LinnStrument is one of the most expressive, evocative and enticing new musical instruments we've seen, and its potential is enormous - but it seems this innovative device might be prevented from coming to the market due to unfortunate IP squabbling in the multitouch sector.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 27,855 articles