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Motorcycles

Yamaha introduces ride-by-wire motorcycle

October 31, 2005 Yamaha recently released the details on its 2006 R6 Supersport motorcycle. It has a fuel-injected 599cc four cylinder engine with four titanium valves per cylinder and revs cleanly to its 17,500 rpm redline, making maximum power of 133bhp at 14,500 rpm – that’s 221 bhp per litre – roughly the equivalent of a front-running MotoGP bike. It’s engine also has a slipper clutch as standard and it is the first production motorcycle with a ride-by-wire throttle. That’s right – there are still throttle cables but they run to a computer, not the carburettor slides.  Read More

Chopper One - a ride fit for a President

Inventor and tireless innovator Eddie Paul was recently featured in Gizmag for his CircleScan camera, CEM engine and bionic shark, but deep down Eddie still loves his original work as a customiser and creator of motorcycles and cars. His latest project has just been completed and when we got our hands on images we thought you might be interested just because of the sheer audacity of the creation. It's a motorcycle powered by a 650 bhp 502 cubic inch Chevy V8 engine with twin superchargers and nitrous oxide injection. Eddie says, "It should top out at about 300 mph and get about 6 mpg on the highway. It weighs about 1000 pounds, has straight pipes (no mufflers) and most importantly, it will get you home from the store before the ice cream melts." The Bike is called Chopper One as it's, "a ride fit for a president." It was built in three weeks for the upcoming SEMA show in Las Vegas Nevada. Check out the images.  Read More

Yamaha introduces computer-operated clutch and electronic shift actuators on FJR1300

October 28, 2005 UPDATED IMAGES Yamaha is introducing an interesting innovation to motorcycling with a 2006 version of the Yamaha FJR1300 – a computer operated, electric gearshift which eliminates the need to operate the clutch. The Yamaha Chip Controlled Shift (YCC-S) system is very similar to the electronic shifting systems used on F1 race cars and as with the cars, you can choose to shift up and down with your left thumb or the old fashioned way with your left foot – neither requires the clutch. Its apparently smoother and faster but we’re not sure if the motorcycle community will be queuing up for this one and the blogs are already full of “scooter” jokes though it must be said this is not an automatic motorcycle. There’s something immensely satisfying about snicking up a gear and feeding in 145 horsepower but we’ll treat it with an open mind until we can throw a leg over it.  Read More

The ultimate long-distance motorcycle for serious globetrotters

October 27, 2005 The 2005 International NEC Motorcycle and Scooter Show will open at Birmingham's National Exhibition Centre tomorrow with the world premier of the ultimate travel and enduro machine - the 2006 BMW R1200 GS Adventure. As a replacement for the hugely popular and successful R1150 GS Adventure, the new 1200cc model will feature more power, less weight, and improved off-road capability. BMW expect that, ultimately, it will penetrate its market segment as the definitive bike for serious long-distance on and off-road riding. Visitors to the BMW stand will be able to enjoy an exclusive look at the latest machine to embody BMW's new design philosophy. The exciting all-terrain machine will assume centre stage on the BMW stand throughout this year's International Motorcycle and Scooter Show.  Read More

Cervical spine protection system for motorcyclists

October 27, 2005 As science advances at a rapid rate, most areas of road safety have improved markedly, with the motorcycle seemingly decades behind the automobile in terms of applied technology to reduce road trauma. For example, the motorcycle airbag recently developed by Honda is a full 25 years behind the first automotive airbag from Mercedes Benz. With motorcycle helmets now compulsory in most markets, the most vulnerable part of a motorcyclist is now the neck and spinal area. A new initiative announced this week betweeon KTM and BMW Motorrad plans to push ahead with the development of an adequate system of protection for this extremely sensitive area. The objective is to reduce the risk of injury to the neck, the cervical spine, the spinal cord and the collar bone in the event of a serious fall. The work builds on and supports the work of South African Dr. Chris Leatt from Leatt-Brace. Leatt-Brace manufactures Kevlar and carbon-fibre neck brace systems for both motorsport and motorcycle sports.  Read More

Yamaha V-Max 2005 and MT-OS concept bikes

October 25, 2005 One of the trends of the most recent motorcycle shows in Paris and Tokyo has been showing new concept motorcycles and being very vague with the information accompanying them. Yamaha has shown a raft of new and fascinating such motocycles at the Tokyo Show but we’re still very much in the dark on two of its concepts. The MT-OS was first shown at the 2005 Paris Motor Show and is a radically styled version of the 89 bhp 1670cc Yamaha MT-O1 – as if the MT-01 wasn’t radical enough. The other is also a reprise of the nearly 20 year old V-Max – Yamaha’s original muscle bike has been brought right up to date though we suspect that the new motor is going to have a much larger capacity. Like 1.8 litres, and 200BHP? Now that’d be worth the two decade wait. Extensive photo galleries inside.  Read More

Honda shows automatic 700 Sports motorcycle

October 24, 2005 One of the surprises of the 39th Tokyo Motor Show 2005 which opened on saturday was Honda's showing of a large-size sports motorcycle concept model dubbed the DN-01. The motorcycle is equipped with a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT) and a water-cooled, 4-stroke, OHC, V-twin, 2-cylinder, 680cc engine. Most significantly, Honda stated that it "will continue the development of DN-01 with the goal of introducing it to the market in the near future." CVT has already been introduced into the market in a range of scooters with Suzuki's futuristic Burgman scooter the most obvious shining example. Honda's version of the CVt is being touted as different to other CVTs and is described as an hydraulic mechanical continuously variable HFT (Human Fitting Transmission) system featuring two automatic modes and a 6-speed manual mode which the rider operates through buttons on the handlebars.  Read More

Suzuki’s Stratosphere unveiled: 180bhp, 1100cc six-cylinder machine

October 20, 2005 Six cylinder motorcycles have been few and far between in the history of powered two-wheelers – Benelli’s Sei, Honda’s CBX and Goldwing, Kawasaki’s Z1300 and now Suzuki’s Stratosphere. The Suzuki Stratosphere is only a concept bike at this stage but vapourware is not in Suzuki’s vocabulary and the company has a strong track record for turning its concepts into reality. The raw figures are 1100cc, 24 valves, 180 horses and a motor reportedly turbine-like smooth. The motor is an engineering masterpiece akin to the miniaturized sophistication of a Swiss watch and the aluminium fairing, electrically-adjustable windscreen, LED headlights, adjustable handlebars, built-in GPS navigation just add to the high-tech cred. We’re not so sure about the orange seat, but love the Katanesque profile. See the photo gallery for details – a stunner and one that we sincerely hope will make it to the showroom floor  Read More

Honda to unveil key motorcycle safety initiatives: rider trainer and airbags

October 15, 2005 One of the sad facts about riding a motorcyle is that although it can accelerate quicker and stop faster than an automobile, the lack of a steel cage surrounding the occupants makes a motorcycle much more dangerous – you’re around seven times more likely to die on a motorcycle than a car for an equivalent distance traveled on public roads. So it’s not surprising that the World’s largest motorcycle manufacturer, Honda, is devoting a considerable share of its massive R&D budget to making motorcycles safer. Next week the company will make two significant technology announcements that will save countless lives in coming years – the world’s first motorcycle airbag, and (much) more importantly, the availability of affordable advanced rider simulation machines for every Honda dealership. Rider training is the key to survivability on a motorcycle and Honda’s groundbreaking development of an affordable rider training simulator is to be loudly applauded. In many countries the simulators will become available in every Honda dealership within 12 months, giving it a massive advantage over its competitors in attracting a greater share of new motorcycle riders.  Read More

Suzuki gets serious with a 107 cubic inch motorcycle

October 11, 2005 The Suzuki M109 is intended for the power cruiser marketplace – the market begun and dominated by Harley Davidson that has attracted competitors from Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki and latterly, the only truly original contender in the field since the Harley itself, Triumph. In this market, brutal torque is the currency, so bigger is better when it comes to engine size and the original Harley V-twins which seemed ginormous at 1280cc have been trumped and countertrumped all the way to 1700cc by Yamaha, 1800cc by Honda and 2000cc by Kawasaki – the largest V-twin motorcycle engine in the world. Then there’s Triumph’s 2300cc Rocket III, but that’s another story entirely. Currently, the Suzuki is the runt of the pack with a capacity of 1.6 litres, but quite soon we’ll see a newer, meaner and much higher revving Suzuki contender – the M109 gets its name from the cubic inches it packs – 109 of them.  Read More

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