This Monday, we presented some background information on Audi's all-electric A2 concept car, along with some sketches. Since then, however, the German automaker has released additional details about the vehicle, along with some more lifelike renderings - it seems that the actual, physical car won't be revealed until its appearance at the International Motor Show in Frankfurt next week. Among the new things we've learned about the A2: its body is made partly from carbon fiber-reinforced polymer; it features braking, shifting and steering by wire; and it can operate semi-autonomously in slow-moving traffic.

The 1,150 kilogram (2,535 lb) four-seater's electric motor delivers 116 PS of peak power (80 PS continuous) and 270 Nm of torque (160 Nm continuous) to the front wheels through a single-speed transmission. This results in a 9.3-second 0-100 km/h (62 mph) acceleration time, and a governed top speed of 150 km/h (93 mph). Its floor-mounted 31 kWh lithium-ion battery pack tops up from empty in 1.5 hours with a 400-volt charge, or in four hours with 230 volts. Its claimed range is 200 kilometers (124 miles).

As we mentioned previously, the car incorporates Audi's matrix beam LED headlights. The tail lights, however, add an interesting feature - five laser diodes produce a light that is invisible in good weather conditions, but that illuminates water droplets to form a floating warning triangle when the fog rolls in.

Inside, mobile devices can be charged without being plugged in, via the company's wireless charging technology. A Bluetooth online car phone connects the vehicle to the Internet using a Mobile Telecommunications Standard module, while an integrated WLAN hotspot lets passengers get online with their mobile devices.

Other features of the A2 include lighting strips on both sides of the vehicle that serve as additional turn indicators and brake lights, dual retractable touchscreen control panels, and a transparent glass roof that can turn opaque thanks to embedded microparticles that align themselves when an electrical current is applied.