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ModCubes: The LEGO bricks of modular furniture

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January 15, 2014

ModCubes can be reconfigured to form different pieces of furniture, such as this crib/cupb...

ModCubes can be reconfigured to form different pieces of furniture, such as this crib/cupboard unit

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Modular furniture – that is, furniture than can be adapted to suit changing needs – is becoming an increasingly common concept. One company has gone right back to basics, and designed building blocks for an extensive range of modular furniture. These building blocks are called ModCubes, and when combined together they form pieces of furniture known as ModRoomz. The word LEGO is nowhere to be seen, but the Danish toy company deserves at least a small nod of appreciation.

Each basic ModCube is a square wooden cube closed in on five sides and open on one side. On the top and bottom of each cube are four indents that, when combined with insert discs, can be used to stack ModCubes securely. The ModCubes can also be adapted into cupboards, shelves, or drawer units, depending on a user’s individual needs.

The idea is that these ModCubes will form the basis for the furniture needs of a family, no matter what life throws at them. A set of ModCubes can therefore start out as the base of a baby’s crib, then be adapted into a single bed, before then being adapted into a corner unit.

ModCubes can be adapted to be cupboards or drawer units

The ModRoomz concept is currently being funded through an Indiegogo campaign. The team behind ModRoomz plan to start small, selling the modular furniture locally, before hopefully expanding across the United States and beyond. Perk levels range from US$250 for five ModCubes, all the way up to $11,000 for a custom ModRoomz design.

The video below shows how the ModCubes can be rearranged over the years to form very different and distinct pieces of furniture.

Source: Indiegogo via Inhabitat

About the Author
Dave Parrack Dave is a technology journalist with a ravenous appetite for gadgets, gizmos, and gubbins. He's based in the U.K., and from his center of operations writes about all facets of modern and future technology. He has learned more in his five years writing for the Web than he did in 11 years at school, and with none of the boring subjects thrown in to the mix.   All articles by Dave Parrack
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8 Comments

Very clever! I hope doing most of a house this way does not end up costing a fortune!

The Skud
15th January, 2014 @ 11:52 pm PST

ahem - nothing new here, everyone move along please...

I have seen this style of design for more than 30 years. In fact I would say that it would have been unusual not to find something very similar in stores like Habitat and Ikea every visit.

Techjunkie88
16th January, 2014 @ 01:33 am PST

This is brilliant. It's about time that something like this was invented, lego block are such a simple idea but these would be brilliant for giving your house a refresh when you feel like it.

Thomas H Wood
16th January, 2014 @ 01:36 am PST

This is not a new idea, we had the same in the 70's and it was called Cubestore.

Terry Pardy
16th January, 2014 @ 01:36 am PST

I can see how they could relate to the Lego toy since they have little nobs that seem to 'connect' them like the Lego blocks do.

I think it is neat how they can be customized to ones needs and/or wants.

BigWarpGuy
16th January, 2014 @ 05:39 am PST

I still have my cubestore boxes, bought in 1983. Ok, it's clever, but it's not new, come on guys.

Chris Hogan
16th January, 2014 @ 11:48 am PST

Have to agree with Terry Pardy on this one. This is not new. Even before the Cubestore, there were boxes called 'milk crates' that people would stack and call furniture. Not that calling them furniture made them furniture...

MBadgero
16th January, 2014 @ 12:40 pm PST

it's new if you haven't seen it, isn't that what nbc says?

audischwaaa
16th January, 2014 @ 04:57 pm PST
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