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Mobile Technology

The Microvision SHOWWX laser pico projector first came to our attention in development back in 2008, with the final version making an appearance at this years CES. Around the size of a smartphone, the SHOWWX projector enables a user to connect their iPod, mobile phone or a myriad of other devices to display movies and photos as a WVGA (848x480 pixels) DVD quality “big screen” experience. Read More
This week at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Palm unveiled its two upcoming Verizon-exclusive smartphones, the Pre Plus and the Pixi Plus. Both phones boast substantial improvements over their present namesakes, and both will utilize Palm’s new webOS developer program, which will allow independent software developers to create and distribute their own apps. Read More
Increasingly, people are carrying a multitude of hand-held devices including perhaps a cell phone, MP3 player and even a GPS and keeping these devices charged whilst on-the-go is an ongoing problem. There could be a simple solution - Easy Energy, Inc has brought its clever YoGen charger to CES 2010. This unique and easy to use, hand-powered charger is a pocket-sized dynamo. It is designed to charge small portable devices such as mobile phones and MP3 players and unlike other battery-free chargers this one doesn't rely on the sun for its power - it uses 'elbow grease' instead. Read More
Samsung has used CES 2010 to launch two new products. The first is the Jitterbug Wellness Call - a new service designed to provide personalized motivation and coaching in order to improve customer’s physical and mental health. The second product is a red cell phone – the Jitterbug J – a phone that delivers American Heart Association health tips to the consumer every day. Read More
The mobile phone and not the Personal Computer, has become the device which democratises information and communication and liberates much of mankind from poverty. With 4.6 billion connections from 6.8 billion people, the mobile phone now touches two thirds of humanity, and as Nokia CEO Olli-Pekka Kallasvuo said in his keynote at CES today, “for the majority of the world's people, their first and only access to the Internet will be through a mobile device, not a PC, and this access is spreading very, very fast. In China, every month more than 7 million people gain access to the Internet for the first time, and mostly on mobile devices. This trend shows no signs of slowing. The mobile device has become a necessity for upward mobility." Kallasvuo used his platform to announce the “Nokia Growth Economy Venture Challenge” - a USD 1 million fund to encourage developers to come up with innovative software to accelerate development in these growth markets. Read More
Qualcomm has revealed what's in store for the Snapdragon platform, which powers Google's Nexus One smartphone, among other things. By the end of January, the 45nm 1.3GHz Snapdragon 8X50A will be available to manufacturers, and should be appearing in products by the end of 2010 - but where things get really exciting is the move to dual-core. Read More

Nexus One news roundup

January 7, 2010
We've aggregated all the latest news on the Nexus One so you don't have to. An impressive market share on debut, worldwide release on Vodafone, European multi-touch, 3G reception issues on T-Mobile, 150 million good reasons why the Nexus One will succeed, and...an angry Dick. Read on for more. Read More
If you've ever lost your phone without having a backup of your contacts, you'll know what a painful experience it is. Enter IDrive Lite, a free service that allows you to backup the contacts on your phone into the cloud. Previously available for iPhone and BlackBerry, it's finally made its way to Android. Read More
Motorola today unveiled the Backflip, follow up to the Android-powered Cliq released last year. Like the Cliq, the Backflip includes Motorola's Motoblur service, which aggregates data from sites like Facebook, Twitter and Gmail and presents it coherently on your home screen - but it's the hardware that really stands out. Read on for the details. Read More
This week at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, e-reading company Skiff is previewing its new electronic reader. At a quarter of an inch thick, the Skiff Reader is the thinnest device of its kind. Not everything about it is small, however; its 1200 x 1600 pixel, 11.5-inch screen is the largest and highest-resolution consumer e-reading display yet. Perhaps its biggest boast, however, is what that display is made of – Instead of rigid, fragile glass, the Skiff Reader’s display utilizes a thin, flexible sheet of stainless-steel foil. Developed by LG specifically for Skiff, the touchscreen foil-display promises an e-reader that will be much more durable than anything currently available. Read More
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