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Medical

— Medical

"Lab-in-a-briefcase" designed to bring early cancer detection to developing countries

Detecting cancer early is difficult enough at the best of times, but the problem is compounded in developing countries where patients don't always have access to advanced diagnostics equipment. A team of UK-based scientists has developed a new tool that could greatly assist those taking the fight to cancer in these regions. Billed as a lab-in-a-briefcase, the low-cost, portable diagnostics tool works similarly to a pregnancy test and can detect cancer biomarkers in as little as 15 minutes.

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Insulin releasing patch draws oral diabetes treatments closer

Of the hundreds of million people around the world that suffer from diabetes, a sizeable portion need to subject themselves to daily insulin injections. But a more palatable way of keeping blood glucose levels in check may be on the way, with scientists developing a patch that attaches to the intestinal wall and releases the hormone after being swallowed in the form of a capsule.

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Hydrogel infused with snake venom stops bleeding within seconds

Major, uncontrolled blood loss can have major ramifications everywhere from the battlefield to the operating theatre. While blood-clotting medications can be used to stem the flow, often their purpose is thwarted by conflicting anti-coagulating drugs that thin the blood instead. But now scientists have developed a promising new hydrogel infused with snake venom that is drawn to the wound and shuts down bleeding in a matter of seconds.

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— Medical

Support bath enables 3D printing of soft biomaterials

When it comes to surgical procedures on internal organs, the heart can be one of the most difficult to work with. Heart tissue doesn't repair itself like that of other body parts, so those with failing hearts only have the option of joining a long waitlist in hopes of receiving a transplant in time. All of this may change in the near future, as a research group at Carnegie Mellon University has demonstrated a method of 3D bioprinting with soft materials.

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— Medical

Implantable LCD eye lenses may make glasses obsolete

The potential for replacing aging or damaged eye lenses with artificial lenses that do more than just restore eyesight has long been recognized. With everything from telescopic capabilities to those with built-in heads-up displays, electronically-enabled synthetic lenses promise to bring useful cybernetic enhancements to the human body. In pursuit of this goal, one researcher at the University of Leeds is developing a unique, auto-focusing liquid crystal lens that may help cure age-related long-sightedness.

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