Decision time? Check out our latest product comparisons

Medical

A vial of the clear hydrogel turns to a white semi-solid as it's heated to body temperatur...

In the field of regenerative medicine, one of the current areas of interest involves the use of scaffolding-like materials that a patient's own cells can be "seeded" onto. As the cells grow and populate the material, they gradually replace it, until all that remains is a solid piece of tissue or bone. Now, scientists at Houston's Rice University have taken that concept a step further, using a polymer that is liquid at room temperature, but that solidifies into a scaffold when injected into patients' bodies.  Read More

A new technique can detect terahertz waves at room temperature quickly and accurately (Ima...

Researchers at the University of Michigan have found a way to accurately detect electromagnetic waves in the terahertz range by first converting them into sound. The advance opens up new applications ranging from tighter airport security to safer medical imaging.  Read More

Scientists have created functioning human heart tissue that exhibits Barth syndrome  (Imag...

When we've previously heard about "organs on a chip," they've been miniature recreations of healthy organs. If they're being used for research into the treatment of health problems, however, then it only makes sense that those "organs" should have something wrong with them. With that in mind, a group of Harvard scientists have created the world's first lab-grown sample of functioning human heart tissue that has a cardiovascular disease.  Read More

A computer algorithm tracks eyes, ears, and a toy, with the goal of spotting warning sympt...

When experts look back over early home movies of babies later diagnosed with autism, they can see the early behavioral markers of the disorder. The average age of diagnosis, however, is 5 years old. The availability and cost of trained clinicians limits not just early awareness, but also research into autism on a large scale. At Duke University, researchers from different disciplines are using computer vision algorithms to make early diagnosis more likely, and even intend to create an app for parents to use at home.  Read More

Tiny, wirelessly-charged medical devices implanted deep inside the human body could treat ...

Researchers at Stanford University have developed a new way to safely transfer energy to tiny medical devices implanted deep inside the human body. The advance could lead to the development of tiny "electroceutical" devices that can be implanted near nerve bundles, heart or brain tissue and stimulate them directly when needed, treating diseases using electronics rather than drugs.  Read More

Researchers at the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) have developed a lab-on-a-chip de...

Researchers at the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) have developed a lab-on-a-chip device that can detect protein cancer markers in a drop of blood, working as a very early cancer-detection system. The device can detect very low concentrations of markers and is reliable, cheap and portable, making it attractive for deployment in remote areas of the world.  Read More

Orbix is offering a new type of breast-lift procedure that supposedly offers better-lastin...

A new procedure promises to lift and support women's breasts with better-lasting results than traditional methods. The Orbix Breast Support System uses thin silicone straps attached to the ribs to provide support. Orbix says the technique "eliminates breast re-sagging and minimizes scarring."  Read More

Purdue's prototype machine prints the exact doses of medication a patient requires (Photo:...

It can be tricky to take exactly one fourths of a pill or the specific dose of prescribed medication, which is why researchers at Purdue University have come up with a way to print the proper dosage that a patient requires. Their prototype uses inkjet printing technology and a predictive mathematical model that calculates exactly how much medicine the patients needs and prints out the precise doses into tablets or films.  Read More

A nanogel developed at IBN may be commercialized as a membrane patch for faster healing of...

Because second- and third-degree burns damage underlying layers of skin, they can take a long time to heal. Such extended healing periods are not only painful to the patient, but increase the risk of infection and scarring. While various medications are available to deal with pain and infection, there is currently no commercial treatment to speed up the rate of healing of burn wounds. Now researchers have developed a nanogel that could fill this hole.  Read More

Dr. Steve Jiang and UT Southwestern Medical Center are pioneering the use of general-purpo...

Medical physicists at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center are latching on to advances in the computational speed of graphics processing units (GPUs) to drastically reduce the time required to calculate radiation therapy plans. The approach also increases the accuracy of calculations, allowing for faster, more precise, and more adaptable treatment of cancer patients.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 29,042 articles