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Medical


— Medical

Drug-infused hydrogel coatings add firepower to nanoshell cancer treatment

By - July 15, 2015 3 Pictures

Building on previous work, researchers at Duke University have developed a new technology that wraps nanoshells in a thin film of drug-infused hydrogel, adding additional firepower to the already promising targeted cancer treatment. The hydrogel is loaded with cancer-fighting drugs and coated onto the nanoshells, which heat up when exposed to infrared light and release the chemotherapeutic drugs, delivering a one-two punch, directly to the tumour.

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— Medical

Smart capsule keeps hold of payload until reaching its target

By - July 15, 2015 3 Pictures

We have drugs to treat nasty conditions like irritable bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease, but unfortunately their effects are often blunted by little stumbling blocks known as the stomach and the small intestine. These body parts are prone to absorbing certain medications before they can do their best work. But a new type of capsule holds onto its payload until reaching the large intestine, making for more effective delivery.

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Ultrasound cuts healing time of chronic wounds by 30 percent

By - July 13, 2015

Further to the mental anguish, a lot of time in a hospital bed can bring about some agonizing physical discomfort. This is most commonly brought about by skin ulcers and bedsores, which threaten to evolve into dangerous and potentially deadly infections if left untreated. But a British research team has happened upon a technique that promises to cut the healing time of these and other chronic wounds by around a third, using simple low-intensity ultrasounds.

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— Medical

Optical device takes after a dog's nose to sniff out disease

By - July 8, 2015

When things in our body go awry, through disease or infection, for example, the types of molecules in our breath can change. These variations have presented researchers around the world with a very real opportunity to detect various conditions, including lung cancer, with unprecedented ease. The latest scientists to start sniffing around this emerging form of medical diagnosis is a team from the University of Adelaide, who are developing a laser instrument inspired by dog's nose that can screen breath samples for signs of unrest.

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— Medical

Smart mouth guard tells users if they're grinding their teeth

By - July 6, 2015

Bruxism – or "tooth-grinding" to most of us – is a very common problem. Often caused by stress, it can cause tooth damage, headaches, insomnia and jaw pain. Unfortunately, because it occurs when we're sleeping, many people don't even realize they're doing it. Often, a night spent under observation at a sleep clinic is the only way of "catching it in action." That could be about to change, however, thanks to the development of a bruxism-detecting mouth guard.

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— Medical

Turning the smartphone into a mobile pregnancy test

By - July 6, 2015

Today's smartphones come chock-full of technological capability, intended to help us with everything from taking holiday snaps, finding our way around a new town or staying connected with people around the world. As it turns out, the hardware inside is starting to show huge promise in the world of medical diagnostics, with smartphones repurposed as blood-scanning microscopes, HIV testers and sleep apnea detectors. The latest advance in this area comes in the form of a fiber optic sensor for smartphones that monitors bodily fluids, a tool that could be used for biomolecular tests such as pregnancy or diabetes monitoring.

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— Medical

Elastic, wound-healing hydrogel activated by light

By - July 5, 2015 2 Pictures

Hydrogels have huge potential in the field of biomedicine, but aren't without their shortcomings in their existing form. These tiny polypeptide chains are championed for their many possible applications. Indeed, in the last few years alone we've seen advances that suggest they could find use in generating new heart tissue, fighting off superbugs and the controlled release of anti-inflammatory drugs. But researchers have now developed a hydrogel that mimics the elasticity of human tissue and can be activated by exposure to light, claiming it could offer safer means of repairing wounded tissue.

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