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Medical

Study shows how Alzheimer's disease destroys brain cell connections early on

A research team led by scientists from the University of New South Wales in Australia has studied the mechanism by which connections in the brain are destroyed in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. The findings represent another angle of attack in the ongoing battle to find a cure for the widespread degenerative condition.Read More

Functional vocal cord tissue grown in the lab for first time

For the first time, scientists have successfully grown vocal cords in the lab, with tests showing the engineered tissue to be functional, with the ability to transmit sound. While the research is just the first step on a long path towards clinical use, the results are very promising, providing a solid basis for future study.Read More

This tiny sensor is like a stethoscope you swallow

Today, measuring a patient's heart and breathing rates typically requires applying some sort of sensors directly to the skin, but new technology invented at MIT uses an ingestible sensor to monitor heart beats and respiration from inside the gastrointestinal tract.Read More

Injectable, intelligent gel targets cancer at the source

Enlisting the body's naturally produced T cells to fight off cancer is an immunotherapy technique that has shown early promise in clinical trials. But one limitation is that these cells generally lack the firepower to do the job on their own, meaning they need to be modified and reintroduced to the bloodstream to have a real impact. Researchers may now have discovered a more efficient way forward, with the development of a T cell-loaded biogel that can be injected directly into the tumor for a more targeted, less laborious approach to immunotherapy.Read More

Respite nebulizer may replace inhalers and injections for drug delivery

Nebulizers aren't anything new – I remember using a big, bulky electric one 25 years ago to help my tiny three-year-old body breathe during asthma attacks. But a new prototype nebulizer developed at RMIT in Melbourne is designed to fit comfortably in your hand and deliver much higher doses of medicine per minute than current nebulizers. The researchers behind the device say it could replace inhalers and injections for people with conditions such as asthma, cancer, cystic fibrosis, and diabetes.Read More

RNA blood test detects, classifies and pinpoints location of cancer

In an effort to find an accurate and easy method of detecting and locating cancers, negating the need for invasive cell tissue sampling, researchers from Umeå University in Sweden have developed a new blood test that looks at blood platelets in just a single drop of blood to identify cancer. Results of the method are very promising, with a 96 percent identification accuracy.
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NiLiBoRo robot cuts around corners for safer head surgery

Removing tumors from the inner ear can be a tricky business, with surgeons often having to remove a large amount of bone to safely complete procedures. Researchers at Germany's Fraunhofer Institute have created a new tool, likened to a robotic worm, that is designed to revolutionize the process, while lowering the physical impact of the surgery on the patient.
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Firefighter gets most comprehensive face transplant yet

In what is being touted as the most complex and complete face transplant ever performed, a crew of medicos at New York University's (NYU) Langone Medical Center has replaced the entire face of 41-year-old Patrick Hardison, a volunteer firefighter who suffered catastrophic burns while on duty in 2001. The team replaced Patrick's scalp, ears and ear canals, parts of bone in the chin and cheeks, and his entire nose. He also received new eyelids and the muscles that control them.Read More

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