Photokina 2014 highlights

Medical

Cells from rats' retinas have been successfully jetted from an inkjet printer (Photo: Shut...

Imagine if conditions that presently cause blindness could be treated by simply by fabricating new tissue, and using it to replace the defective part of the retina. We may not be at that point yet, but we've definitely taken a step closer, thanks to research being conducted at the University of Cambridge. Scientists there have successfully used an inkjet printer to "print" rats' retinal cells onto a substrate, paving the way for the creation of custom-made eye-repair material.  Read More

NTU Prof Peter Preiser and scientist Dr Annie Gao

A new discovery by scientists from Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University (NTU) holds promise for the development of a Malaria vaccine. The result of five years research, the breakthrough is based on the ability to block the invasion of red blood cells by the deadly parasite.  Read More

The BioPen lets surgeons 'draw' live cells and growth factors directly onto the site of an...

Devices like the 3Doodler and SwissPen literally put 3D printing technology in the hands of consumers, but a new BioPen developed at the University of Wollongong in Australia is targeted at more skilled hands. The handheld device is designed to let surgeons "draw" live cells and growth factors directly onto the site of an injury to help accelerate the regeneration of functional bone and cartilage.  Read More

A newly developed nanoparticle may signal the end of injections for treatment of some comm...

Most of us would swallow a pill before being poked by a needle, yet sufferers of chronic illnesses are regularly required to administer their medicine intravenously. A team of researchers from MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) has developed a new type of nanoparticle that could afford patients the choice – potentially making uncomfortable injections a thing of the past in the treatment of a range of chronic diseases.  Read More

Controlling virtual arms and hands with the minds could help stroke patient rehabilitation...

Earlier this year, we saw an amazing demonstration of an EEG skullcap interface that allowed a quadcopter to be controlled with only thoughts. Now the same technology is pioneering a medical therapy in which stroke patients can use their thoughts to guide a simulation, and thus rebuild damaged neurons. As the “virtual reality hands” provide customization and direct feedback of one’s progress, this could be an improvement over traditional therapy methods.  Read More

Researchers have regrown hair, cartilage, bone and soft tissues in a mouse model (Photo: R...

Anyone who has left youth behind them knows that bumps and scrapes don't heal as fast as they used to. But that could change with researchers at the Stem Cell Program at Boston Children's Hospital finding a way to regrow hair, cartilage, bone, skin and other soft tissues in a mouse by reactivating a dormant gene called Lin28a. The discovery could lead to new treatments that provide adults with the regenerative powers they possessed when very young.  Read More

WatsonPaths uses natural language and the ability to process unstructured data to aid diag...

When IBM’s Watson supercomputer took on two human champions of the television quiz show Jeopardy and won, it was hailed as a breakthrough in machine intelligence. Now in an effort to expand the practical applications for the "world’s smartest computer," IBM Research and has taken the wraps off two new projects aimed at the medical community.  Read More

Students of the Biodesign program design MetaboShield to fight obesity and reverse type 2 ...

MetaboShield, is an innovative intestinal sleeve that can be lodged permanently in the small intestine via the throat in an anesthesia-free procedure. Though it is still a prototype, when developed the sleeve could help people shed unwanted pounds and potentially help reverse type 2 diabetes.  Read More

Plans are underway to provide a digital alternative to traditional autopsy (Photo: Shutter...

By using raw data from Multi Slice Computerized Tomography (MSCT) and processing it through sophisticated software on high performance computer systems, Malaysian entrepreneur Mathavan (Matt) Chandran hopes to largely negate the need to slice open bodies at autopsy. His digital autopsy software exploits the power of existing 2D and 3D imaging and visualization equipment to observe and investigate the human body using high definition imagery.  Read More

The MAP System provides a real-time display of the pressure points on a patient's body

For long-term hospital patients or people who are otherwise bedridden, bedsores can be a major problem. Technically known as decubitus ulcers, they form when one area of the skin is subjected to too much prolonged pressure. In order to keep them from occurring, hospital staff regularly turn patients over in their beds. The MAP System is designed to aid those caregivers, by providing them with real-time imagery of the pressure points on the patient’s body.  Read More

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