Shopping? Check out our latest product comparisons

Medical

Controlling virtual arms and hands with the minds could help stroke patient rehabilitation...

Earlier this year, we saw an amazing demonstration of an EEG skullcap interface that allowed a quadcopter to be controlled with only thoughts. Now the same technology is pioneering a medical therapy in which stroke patients can use their thoughts to guide a simulation, and thus rebuild damaged neurons. As the “virtual reality hands” provide customization and direct feedback of one’s progress, this could be an improvement over traditional therapy methods.  Read More

Researchers have regrown hair, cartilage, bone and soft tissues in a mouse model (Photo: R...

Anyone who has left youth behind them knows that bumps and scrapes don't heal as fast as they used to. But that could change with researchers at the Stem Cell Program at Boston Children's Hospital finding a way to regrow hair, cartilage, bone, skin and other soft tissues in a mouse by reactivating a dormant gene called Lin28a. The discovery could lead to new treatments that provide adults with the regenerative powers they possessed when very young.  Read More

WatsonPaths uses natural language and the ability to process unstructured data to aid diag...

When IBM’s Watson supercomputer took on two human champions of the television quiz show Jeopardy and won, it was hailed as a breakthrough in machine intelligence. Now in an effort to expand the practical applications for the "world’s smartest computer," IBM Research and has taken the wraps off two new projects aimed at the medical community.  Read More

Students of the Biodesign program design MetaboShield to fight obesity and reverse type 2 ...

MetaboShield, is an innovative intestinal sleeve that can be lodged permanently in the small intestine via the throat in an anesthesia-free procedure. Though it is still a prototype, when developed the sleeve could help people shed unwanted pounds and potentially help reverse type 2 diabetes.  Read More

Plans are underway to provide a digital alternative to traditional autopsy (Photo: Shutter...

By using raw data from Multi Slice Computerized Tomography (MSCT) and processing it through sophisticated software on high performance computer systems, Malaysian entrepreneur Mathavan (Matt) Chandran hopes to largely negate the need to slice open bodies at autopsy. His digital autopsy software exploits the power of existing 2D and 3D imaging and visualization equipment to observe and investigate the human body using high definition imagery.  Read More

The MAP System provides a real-time display of the pressure points on a patient's body

For long-term hospital patients or people who are otherwise bedridden, bedsores can be a major problem. Technically known as decubitus ulcers, they form when one area of the skin is subjected to too much prolonged pressure. In order to keep them from occurring, hospital staff regularly turn patients over in their beds. The MAP System is designed to aid those caregivers, by providing them with real-time imagery of the pressure points on the patient’s body.  Read More

The active cannula goes to work on a simulated blood clot

Intracerebral hemorrhaging is what occurs when a blood vessel in the brain bursts, and the blood which subsequently leaks out of that vessel forms a clot that places pressure on the surrounding brain tissue. It’s not that uncommon of an occurrence, it’s difficult to treat, and is fatal in about 40 percent of cases. Help may be on the way, however. A team from Nashville’s Vanderbilt University has created a robotic device that is designed to remove those clots, in a safe and minimally-invasive fashion.  Read More

The GuideIN Tube and some of its creators

When a patient is placed under general anesthesia or otherwise has difficulty breathing on their own, they typically have a plastic endotracheal tube inserted into their mouth and down their trachea. This process maintains a clear air passage to the lungs, and is known as intubation. In order to make it safer and easier, students from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Biodesign program have created a robotic intubation device, that takes some of the guesswork out of the procedure.  Read More

The iKnife has been used in tests in 91 operations, where it showed 100 percent accuracy w...

Dr. Zoltan Takats of the Imperial College London has developed one very sharp knife – and we're not referring to its keen edge. The Intelligent Knife (iKnife) is equipped with a nose and a brain that can sniff out cancer as it cuts. Using a mass spectrometer to detect chemical profiles associated with tumors, it enables instant identification of cancerous tissue and helps surgeons to make sure that all of a tumor has been removed.  Read More

The US Supreme Court has ruled that human genes cannot be patented Image: Shutterstock)

In what is being ballyhooed as a landmark decision likely to set the course of DNA-based diagnostic and therapeutic medicine for the next several decades, the US Supreme Court unanimously decided on June 13 that human genes are not patentable. Rather than objects invented or discovered, human genes are henceforth to be treated as "naturally occurring phenomena," and hence fail the patentability test under 35 USC 101. As is usual in patent cases, however, the ruling contains delicate shades of meaning.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 28,158 articles