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— Medical

Ultrasound technique shown to reverse Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice

By - February 12, 2015 2 Pictures
Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided ultrasound, a technology that involves highly-targeted ultrasound beams and monitoring their effects through imaging, has shown to help treat symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in mice. The treatment was found to improve brain performance in the animals and has the researchers hopeful that the technique may prove effective in improving cognitive behavior in humans. Read More
— Medical

Coral tentacles inspire bio-sock shown to treat Deep Vein Thrombosis

By - February 10, 2015 2 Pictures
The onset of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), whereby a clot forms in the veins and obstructs blood flow, is a legitimate concern for people unable to move their legs. The condition can become truly life-threatening if the clot finds its way into the pulmonary artery, which carries deoxygenated blood to the lungs. Looking to mitigate the dangers of this condition, researchers have developed a specialty sock inspired by the tentacle movements of coral that is designed to stimulate blood circulation through the body. Read More
— Medical

Implantable device targets tumors using electric fields

By - February 5, 2015
Further to a list of side effects ranging from mildly unpleasant to just plain awful, the scattergun nature of chemotherapy often sees healthy tissue damaged along with the cancerous cells. Attacking these cancer cells with better precision would lead to more effective treatments and reduce harmful side effects, and has been a primary objective for researchers. Among this group is a team of scientists that has developed a way of administering cancer-fighting chemicals using an electric field that is claimed to enable a highly-targeted form of treatment. Read More
— Medical

Eyedrops may be replaced by stick-on nanowafers

By - February 5, 2015
As anyone who has ever used medicinal eyedrops will know, it's hard to get the things into your own eye. Soon, however, they could be replaced by tiny drug-containing polymer "nanowafers" that are applied to the eye like a contact lens. Those wafers would proceed to gradually dissolve, releasing medication throughout the day. Read More
— Medical

Managing diabetes could one day be as easy as popping a pill

By - February 4, 2015
Researchers at Cornell University have successfully treated diabetic rats by engineering a strain of lactobacillus, a rod-shaped bacteria common in the human gut, resulting in up to 30 percent lower blood glucose levels. The technology could pave the way for a new treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes that could one day see managing diabetes be as easy as taking a daily probiotic pill.. Read More
— Medical

Smartphone dongle detects HIV and syphilis markers in 15 minutes

By - February 4, 2015 3 Pictures
That smartphones have evolved to be capable of much more than making and receiving calls won't be news to many, but work being done to refashion them as medical diagnostics tools is proving to be a very promising area of mobile innovation. The latest big-picture idea to emerge in this area is a smartphone dongle capable of detecting three infectious disease markers within 15 minutes, requiring only a finger prick of blood. Read More
— Medical

Scientists float soap bubbles as a more effective drug delivery method

By - January 29, 2015
As if soap bubbles don't spread enough happiness on their own, scientists have discovered a way of coating them in biomolecules with a view to treating viruses, cancer and other diseases. The technology has been developed at the University of Maryland, where researchers devised a method of tricking the body into mistaking the bubbles for harmful cells, triggering an immune response and opening up new possibilities in the delivery of drugs and vaccines. Read More
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