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Quirky refurbishment "slides" seaside townhouse facade onto the ground

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October 3, 2013

The newly opened installation will stay put until October, 2014 (Photo: Alex Chinneck)

The newly opened installation will stay put until October, 2014 (Photo: Alex Chinneck)

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It's not unusual to see a project that straddles the worlds of art and architecture, but this piece by Alex Chinneck, wonderfully titled From the knees of my nose to the belly of my toes, is surely a stand-out. I'm not sure which is the most eye-catching feature of this bizarre refurbishing of a four-story house: the curving brick facade that seems to have slipped down onto the ground, or the gaping cavity exposing the innards of the top floor as the notional result of said slide.

The property had stood vacant on Godwin Road in Margate, England for 11 years before the district council okayed the installation. It's an area that has suffered from the dreaded d-word (decline) as tourism has decreased over the years.

The work was conceived entirely by 28-year-old artist and designer Alex Chinneck who, having been given the go-ahead, spent six months convincing industry to donate the materials, expertise and machine time needed to see the project through.

"Alex Chinneck's practice playfully warps the everyday world around us," says the accompanying press release, "presenting surreal spectacles in the places we expect to find something familiar."

The newly opened installation will stay put until October, 2014. It's hoped cultural works like this will help to boost tourism in the area.

Source: Alex Chinneck

About the Author
James Holloway James lives in East London where he punctuates endless tea drinking with freelance writing and meteorological angst. Unlocking Every Extend Extra Extreme’s “Master of Extreme” achievement was the fourth proudest moment of his life.   All articles by James Holloway
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9 Comments

I think the title is a bit misleading - surely a non-functional art facade does not constitute a 'refurbishment'. I opened the article expecting a story about interesting architecture and was disappointed.

Chris__
3rd October, 2013 @ 07:48 pm PDT

So what next? The "new, improved" version with a complete front wall? Clever, but ultimately pointless. I wondeer if they sealed and waterproofed that gaping hole / floor / ceiling, or if the next decent storm fills it with water!

The Skud
3rd October, 2013 @ 11:23 pm PDT

sometimes art+architecture=crap

nutcase
4th October, 2013 @ 07:06 am PDT

Dali and other DaDaists would be Delighted!

StWils
4th October, 2013 @ 09:57 am PDT

Quality bricklaying, but is this house really for living in? How do you keep the rain out and why is all that crap left in the loft?

A piece of self-indulgence IMHO.

anobium
4th October, 2013 @ 10:38 am PDT

Better to slide than to topple. Maybe these guys are onto something re: earthquake readiness.

Mirmillion
4th October, 2013 @ 11:12 am PDT

Will it be fixed up into a proper house after the "art" is done or will it be all knocked down?

Gregg Eshelman
4th October, 2013 @ 04:47 pm PDT

A nice bit of fun, lighten up guys. I am sure the neighbours prefer this bit of art to having a run-down property next door. Hopefully it would draw a few extra tourists to the area.

Riaanh
7th October, 2013 @ 05:43 am PDT

"A nice bit of fun, lighten up guys. I am sure the neighbours prefer this bit of art to having a run-down property next door. Hopefully it would draw a few extra tourists to the area."

I getcha. But it just seems to me more $ could be made renting the structure out. I don't see this as being a huge tourist draw. It also appears to be on a public street. I can drive by, click it w/out paying. I "flip" property, but maybe I should become an artist.......

noteugene
7th October, 2013 @ 12:20 pm PDT
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