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Infiniti M Hybrid equals Lamborghini Countach in standing quarter mile

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September 21, 2011

The Infinit M Hybrid has claimed the record for the world's fastest accelerating full hybr...

The Infinit M Hybrid has claimed the record for the world's fastest accelerating full hybrid vehicle

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Records may come and go but, aside from grabbing headlines, they're a way of benchmarking the progress of new technologies. In the automotive world this means hybrid drivetrains and we've seen a number of new record attempts in recent times - usually related to fuel economy as with the Kia Optima Drive. The latest comes from Nissan, whose Infiniti luxury division is claiming the world's fastest accelerating full hybrid vehicle in the form of the Infiniti M Hybrid. The M Hybrid has covered the standing quarter mile (400 m) in an average time of 13.9031 seconds - putting it on par with a 1982 Lamborghini Countach.

The record came in a standard production model Infiniti M35h Hybrid, which Nissan points out already holds the 0-100 km/h (62 mph) record of 5.5 seconds. The record attempt was overseen by an adjudicator from Guinness World Records at the UK's Santa Pod Raceway with journalist Tim Pollard at the wheel. The vehicle is powered by a V6 ICE complemented by a 67-horsepower (50 kW) electric motor that combine for a total system power output of 360 horsepower, which is delivered to the rear wheel in a two-clutch system. Nissan says this configuration maximizes both performance and efficiency, while allowing the car to run in electric-only mode at speeds of up to 100 km/h (62 mph).

The 13.9031-second record, which was an average of all runs, included a run of 13.8960 seconds and puts the Infiniti M on a par with the likes of the 1982 Lamborghini Countach (13.9 seconds), the 1998 BMW M3 (13.8 seconds), and 2007 Aston Martin V8 Vantage Volante and 2007 Porsche 911 Carrera (both 13.6 seconds).

"The Infiniti M35h proves that hybrids can be fast as well as frugal," said Tim Pollard, who is the associate editor of the UK's CAR Magazine. "At Santa Pod you could feel the instant torque of the electric motor away from standstill - the car just leapt off the line. I did try changing gears manually, but it was fastest left in automatic. That was when we achieved the fastest single run of 13.8960 seconds."

Here's CAR Magazine's coverage of the record run:

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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4 Comments

This isn't that impressive. Almost everyone had the Countach poster along with the tennis girl scratching her butt posters up and figured that was as good as it got. The problem was if you ever got to actually drive a Countach you were in for massive disappointment. Most modern cars are faster, handled far better, didn't require you to be a weightlifter to steer, or require a hammer to shift gears. The one thing they can't touch even after what 30 years is the looks. It was and is a gorgeous looking and sounding car that drove and handled like a loaded dump truck while being surprisingly SLOW.

I guess one should never try to fulfill ones dreams, I'd bet even that tennis girl might be a bit disapointing these days too ;-]

Wragie Wrawagie
21st September, 2011 @ 10:29 am PDT

@Wragie Wrawagie

I've never driven a Lamborgini Countach (but once been a passenger in a Diablo), so I can only quote how others descrice its handling. It seems you do the same, with apparently questionable source quality, as some of your claims are false. It's a well documented fact that the Countach was the worlds fastest production car for more than 10 years, capable of about 310 km/h (192 miles/h) and 0-100 km/h (62 miles) in about 3,5 seconds. That's NOT slow, no matter what comparison. It was designet 1971 and in production from -74. Obviously an almost 40 years old car cant be compared with present day supercars. But as you say, the design of the Countach is a masterpiece. Almost all supercars since are strongly influenced by its concept and looks. It wasn't made to be a user friendly car, but it was freakin' fast and it was a total game changer.

Stein Varjord
21st September, 2011 @ 06:55 pm PDT

Nice to see brains beat brawn. The Infinity is only 0.1 seconds faster to 60mph than the much sexier Tesla S sedan. The Tesla S at $49,900 is also about $4,000 cheaper than the Infinity M35h.

Calson
22nd September, 2011 @ 01:09 pm PDT

Fast and quick are two different things.

Top speed the Count was fast.

Acceleration? No way.

What makes a car "fast" keeps it from being "quick",in terms of acceleration.

Gearing. For the price of a clutch in a Countach you can buy 11 second cars all day long...

and still have registration,insurance,fuel and even tires

for quite some time if you know what you're doing.

Those cars are mostly for people who want to show off,

not necessarily go fast or quick.

For the record, I would also dispute it's claim to "world's fastest",

whatever source is quoted.

Dodge Daytonas and Plymouth Superbirds were capable of superior speeds. One Daytona went 243mph at the Chrysler Proving Grounds in Chelsea, MI in 1971. That was a 426 Hemi with NO Nitrous,NO blower and NO Turbo - just a single low-rise 4-barrel carb. That's STILL fast for those conditions. That particular car was not "stock" but that still goes to show what they were capable of with very little modifications.

The Daytonas had a .28 drag coefficient, for one thing... with incredible downforce.

Griffin
22nd September, 2011 @ 05:39 pm PDT
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