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iDrive portable HDD provides online backup option

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February 5, 2009

The iDrive portable Hard Drive.

The iDrive portable Hard Drive.

February 6, 2009 In the days of yore people were forced to backup their precious data on floppy disks, CDs or magnetic tape. Nowadays people looking to protect data have a much wider and more convenient range of options. The iDrive gives users that little extra bit of security by combining portable hard drive and online backup in on package.

For local backup the iDrive, which its makers tout as “the thinnest and lightest portable USB drive ever in its class” at 10mm deep and 0.3 lb in weight, boasts 320GB of storage space on a 5400 RPM 2.5-inch drive that is housed in a stylish brushed aluminum casing. The iDrive is also USB powered so it runs off a computer’s USB port with no external power source. The iDrive portable application included with the device makes backing up easy. Unfortunately the application is only available for Windows machines, but the drive can be used on Macs as a Time Machine Disk.

Like the Sandisk Cruzer Titanium Plus, those looking for that extra layer of protection for their data can also backup their data online. The simple interface is designed to make online backup just as simple as backing up locally and is available in Windows and Mac varieties. Features include Automatic Backup, True Archiving, Versioning, Continuous Backup, Mapped Drive Backup and Web-based Backup Management. Now you can stop fretting about losing your important data and get a good night’s sleep.

The iDrive is available now for USD$119.95 and users get 2GB of online storage space free, but will have to shell out USD 4.95 a month for 150GB.

Darren Quick

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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