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IBM patents bullet-dodging technology

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February 15, 2009

An illustration from the IBM Patent Application.

An illustration from the IBM Patent Application.

February 16, 2009 IBM once owned the computer marketplace, and although it no longer holds quite such prominence in the digital arena, it has retained the Number One Plate Holder's title at the US Patent Office for 16 years straight, winning the 2008 "most innovative" championship with 4,186 U.S. Patents, beating Samsung (3515) and Canon (2114). Indeed, last year its issuances were greater than Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, Oracle, Apple, EMC, Accenture and Google combined.

The company's research efforts of recent times have astounded even seasoned patent watchers – on February 3 it filed a patent for bionic body armor which not only recognises a bullet has been fired, but delivers a shock to the target's appropriate muscles so they step out fo the bullet's trajectory.

Via: TechFragments.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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2 Comments

I'm just wondering if your being shot at if you may be thrown in the path of friendly fire or possibility of when your in gaging the enemies that you may shoot a civilian? do to the fact that this vest is controlling your mussels.

frenchfry65

Frenchfry65~~~ It all depends on how accurate the analysis of the bullets trajectory is done by the vest/bodyarmor. For it to be use-full on a combat level, you can be sure that the armor wouldn\'t be throwing around the combatant mid-combat because not only would that risk being thrown out from cover but as you said running into friendly fire or random crossfire as i\'m sure no armor can change your direction mid-air.

However if say the armor is highly accurate in calculating bullet trajectories it could if anything send a shock at the right time so that your body \"twitches\" just enough to not be hit, of course that would mean lots of instant processing power, that would calculate the type of gun, (maybe even bullet), cameras in order to cover a target in a 360 degree manner so i\'m not sure how they would overcome the equipement problems either you would be carrying a powerful ass computer on your back or information would be relayed via satellite, or as the picture states maybe a stand-alone mobile data relay like maybe a humvee or patrol car with the sole purpose of computing that information. In which case you come to another problem of time lag, especially when dealing with lethal force every millisecond counts that information would have to be traveling to and fro extremely fast for it to be just as successful as jumping behind cover would be :)

Revamp
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