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INKAS Huron is fast and light – for an armored personnel carrier

By

June 12, 2014

The INKAS Huron APC

The INKAS Huron APC

Image Gallery (12 images)

The National Police of Colombia are about to receive the first four production units of a new armored personnel carrier that may look like an angry Hummer limo, but is in fact built around a Kenworth chassis and drive train. Made by Toronto-based INKAS Armored Vehicle Manufacturing, the Huron APC incorporates "revolutionary lightweight armor" which is claimed to give it more speed and maneuverability than other similarly-sized armored vehicles.

The Huron can carry up to 16 passengers, in a compartment that (on the base model) can withstand fire from an AK-47. The engine bay is protected by that same armor, plus the floor can withstand the detonation of two DM-51 German ordnance hand grenades or equivalent light anti-personnel mines.

Along with individual gun ports along both sides of the vehicle, there's also an optional roof-mounted gun turret that can be customized to the client's needs.

The floor can withstand the detonation of two DM-51 German ordnance hand grenades or equiv...

Power is delivered to all four wheels by an 8.3L Paccar engine and a 10-speed manual Allison transmission. A dashboard indicator lets the driver know if a tire has been pierced, while a built-in compressor will automatically re-inflate that tire (if possible), allowing the vehicle to keep moving at up to 140 km/h (87 mph).

According to a report in The Globe and Mail, pricing for the Huron ranges between US$485,000 and $630,000, depending on how it's outfitted. Pop stars and Arnold Schwarzenegger take note, however – it can only be sold through government tenders or law enforcement agencies, given that it's intended for use in "police and military tactical missions, convoy protection and border control all over the world."

It can be seen in action, albeit moving rather slowly, in the video below.

Source: INKAS via The Globe and Mail

About the Author
Ben Coxworth An experienced freelance writer, videographer and television producer, Ben's interest in all forms of innovation is particularly fanatical when it comes to human-powered transportation, film-making gear, environmentally-friendly technologies and anything that's designed to go underwater. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, where he spends a lot of time going over the handlebars of his mountain bike, hanging out in off-leash parks, and wishing the Pacific Ocean wasn't so far away.   All articles by Ben Coxworth
10 Comments

So this vehicle has 'revolutionary lightweight armour' that will withstand a couple of hand grenades????

BIG DEAL!

Have they tested it against any halfway decent Afghanistan-type IED? The type that gave all the different armies trouble?

Apart from the troop carrying capacity, I have seen anti-terrorist politicians limos that boast better safety than that!

The Skud
12th June, 2014 @ 07:30 pm PDT

And the police state gets stronger one tactical whatchamacallit vehicle at a time.

Daniel Bruce
12th June, 2014 @ 08:14 pm PDT

Good for the threats of the zombie apocalypse but not much more.

Slowburn
12th June, 2014 @ 09:59 pm PDT

Still intimidating...

Kevin Cloete
13th June, 2014 @ 04:16 am PDT

The stated level of armor and resistance does not seem to meet the U.S.Army MRAP level. While the price is far less than the MRAP's 2.5 mil each I am sure the IEDs made by the Taliban & ISIS could toss this truck around without much trouble. Needs more work, especially on deflective surfaces on the underside of the whole truck. Deflecting a blast is better than trying to take the whole hit on your chin, as it were.

StWils
13th June, 2014 @ 10:49 am PDT

Many armoured vehicles with howitzer in Asia currently travelling up to speed of 150 km/h to 180 km/h. So a vehicle without howitzer at 140 km/h is nothing.

Freddie Krug
13th June, 2014 @ 09:52 pm PDT

Problem is that it has 4 highly exposed wheels. In an actual scenario which this is designed for the wheels and axles can be damaged and there is no backup.

There should be atleast 4 double wheels at the back and 4 in the front.

unless this is in some ' light ' vehicle class, for which there are many small 4 wheel apcs.

Dawar Saify
14th June, 2014 @ 12:24 am PDT

Since there's now very little difference between police and military, this APC on steroids has the agility, versatility and staying power to get 16 personnel to the event site quickly and efficiently with just the right amount of armor to ensure their safety. For only about half a million, it's a bargain...

But does it have cup holders, a DVD player and a GPS street finder? Well, at least a mini-fridge for the beers :)

owlbeyou
14th June, 2014 @ 06:49 am PDT

@ Dawar Saify

For this vehicle threats that will take off a tire are too few and far between to justify the cost. The central tire pressure control will usually keep her mobile when a tire is punctured by gunfire.

She is already expensive dealing with every threat that can be imagined just adds cost without materially increasing its utility.

Slowburn
14th June, 2014 @ 10:58 pm PDT

Doug & Bob McKinzie of The Great White North are disappointed, and liked my comment Ben. They have pretty thick skin.

I can see American Police Departments drooling as they Militarize Up. Don't expect great depth in understanding the faults of this machine, it is the image that they like. Think, Deputy Barney Fife here.

A technique in personal fighting is to take out the knee. I see four of them.

lwesson
16th June, 2014 @ 07:38 am PDT
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