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How iFart iPhone software makes US$10,000 a day

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December 23, 2008

December 24, 2008 Tales of becoming instantly wealthy in the computer software industry were common a few decades ago, but the growth of online sales for iPhone apps via Apple’s popular iTunes App Store is starting to create a few overnight developer successes too. One of the stars of the last few weeks has been the iFart program – successfully digitising scatalogical humour, the US$0.99 app offers a virtual orchestra of flatulent effects (choose from the “squeeser”, the “wet one”, the “quack”, the “sick dog” and 16 more) and there’s a “Sneak Attack” function where you can set your phone up to trumpet rude noises a few minutes down the track. You may well scoff at the infantile humor, but thousands, indeed, tens of thousands of men are embracing their inner child and purchasing the application every day – sales revenues reached US$9000 a day on December 22.

The iFart Mobile app was developed by author and entrepreneur Joel Comm, CEO of, InfoMedia Inc. and Joel has been unusually transparent with his sales data on his personal blog as the app has rocketed from launch in October to US$10,000 a day revenue just two months later.

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About the Author
Mike Hanlon Mike grew up thinking he would become a mathematician, accidentally started motorcycle racing, got a job writing road tests for a motorcycle magazine while at university, and became a writer. As a travelling photojournalist during his early career, his work was published in a dozen languages across 20+ countries. He went on to edit or manage over 50 print publications, with target audiences ranging from pensioners to plumbers, many different sports, many car and motorcycle magazines, with many more in the fields of communication - narrow subject magazines on topics such as advertising, marketing, visual communications, design, presentation and direct marketing. Then came the internet and Mike managed internet projects for Australia's largest multimedia company, Telstra.com.au (Australia's largest Telco), Seek.com.au (Australia's largest employment site), top100.com.au, hitwise.com, and a dozen other internet start-ups before founding Gizmag in 2002. Now he writes and thinks. All articles by Mike Hanlon
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