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Hov Pod personal hovercraft

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November 6, 2008

The Hov Pod.

The Hov Pod.

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November 7, 2008 UK based Reaction International Ltd. has added to its line of personal leisure hovercraft with the Hov Pod SPX 120 Turbo. Powered by a 120 HP 4 stroke Weber engine which offers greater performance and range, the SPX 120 hovers at a height of 9-inches over any flat surface, including water, ice, snow, sand, mud or grass and can reach speeds approaching 50mph on water. It's also buoyant enough to take over a ton in weight before water ingresses into the hull, making it suitable for commercial, patrol and rescue use.

Whereas the older Hov Pod ACX model was made from glass fiber, and was quite labor-intensive to produce, the Hov Pod SPX is manufactured using high-impact polyethylene with built-in buoyancy composite layer. More buoyant than glass fiber hovercraft models, High Impact PE can withstand considerable knocks while air feed holes allow air to feed into segmented skirts to allow the craft to hover on its cushion of air.

Two additional models complete the SPX line: the SPX 65 model with a Rotax (582) 65 HP 2-stroke engine and the SPX 72 version with a Weber 72 HP 4-stroke engine. All models seat three adults, weigh 310 Kg, measure 11.9-feet long by 6.1-feet wide, hover at a height of 9-inches and are able to reach speeds of 40 – 45mph on water with a cruising speed of 20mph.

The SPX is aimed primarily at the leisure and rental market, rescue and commercial organizations have also shown interest. While it might not be suitable for the morning commute, nothing says fun more than a hovercraft.

For further info visit Hov Pod.

About the Author
Darren Quick Darren's love of technology started in primary school with a Nintendo Game & Watch Donkey Kong (still functioning) and a Commodore VIC 20 computer (not still functioning). In high school he upgraded to a 286 PC, and he's been following Moore's law ever since. This love of technology continued through a number of university courses and crappy jobs until 2008, when his interests found a home at Gizmag.   All articles by Darren Quick
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