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Honda Fit EV receives highest-ever EPA efficiency rating

By

June 7, 2012

Honda has announced that its new Fit EV has received a combined adjusted Environmental Pro...

Honda has announced that its new Fit EV has received a combined adjusted Environmental Protection Agency mile-per-gallon-equivalency rating of 118 MPGe, nudging it ahead of all of its nearest rivals in the emerging EV market

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As the promised summer 2012 California and Oregon rollout of Honda's 2013 Fit EV approaches, the battle for "fuel" efficiency supremacy has begun. Honda has announced that its new battery electric vehicle has received a combined adjusted Environmental Protection Agency mile-per-gallon-equivalency rating of 118 MPGe (1.99 L/100km equivalent), nudging it ahead of all of its nearest rivals in the emerging EV market.

Honda reports that the EPA has given its Fit EV (which made its debut at last year's Los Angeles Auto Show) a rating of 132 MPGe (1.78L/100km) for city driving, 105 (2.24) for highway and 118 combined, plus a very low consumption of only 29 kWh per 100 miles (160 km), a combined city/highway estimated driving range rating of 82 miles (131.9 km) and an estimated annual "fuel" cost of just US$500. As you can see from the table below, that puts the five-passenger battery electric vehicle ahead of all of its nearest competitors - the i-MIEV, the Leaf and the Focus Electric:

EPA rating table generated by Honda

The vehicle features a 20 kWh Li-ion battery that can be recharged in less than three hours from a 240-volt circuit, and a 92 kilowatt/123 horsepower high-density coaxial electric motor which delivers 254 Nm of torque (compared to 143 Nm offered by the gas-powered Fit/Jazz vehicle). The Fit EV has a top speed of 92 mph (148 km/h) and can sprint from zero to 60 mph (96.5 km/h) in 9.5 seconds. It also benefits from fully-independent suspension and a three-mode drive system adapted from the company's CR-Z Sport Hybrid model.

Honda reports that the EPA has given its Fit EV a rating of 132 MPGe for city driving, 105...

The initial leasing cost of the 2013 Fit EV has been slightly revised since launch to $389 per month for three years, and the MSRP comes in at $37,415.

Have a look at the following overview video to whet your appetite for the most "fuel" efficient EV (shortly to be) available:

Source: Honda

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Paul Ridden While Paul is loath to reveal his age, he will admit to cutting his IT teeth on a TRS-80 (although he won't say which version). An obsessive fascination with computer technology blossomed from hobby into career before the desire for sunnier climes saw him wave a fond farewell to his native Blighty in favor of Bordeaux, France. He's now a dedicated newshound pursuing the latest bleeding edge tech for Gizmag.   All articles by Paul Ridden
8 Comments

Thanks for the article, its encouraging. When you adjust for the higher purchase (MSRP) cost of the electric car, replacement batteries, reduced fuel costs, is this still an desirable car to own from a 5 or 10 year total cost perspective? It would be interesting to compare total cost of ownership of both the gasoline and e-car (same model).

I have a feeling that bringing back electric trolleys (or, in general, mass public transport) for all of our major cities (and ban individual cars, except for perhaps taxis and delivery vehicles) would really help to solve our congestion/ oil dependence/ parking/ pollution issues...

Anyway, my 2 cents. Michael Mac

Michael MacLauchlan
7th June, 2012 @ 12:57 pm PDT

@Michael - Since the batteries are good for a minimum of 10 years, replacement cost isn't even an issue. So yes, overall you save about $1200 a year in fuel costs.

Eletruk
7th June, 2012 @ 05:50 pm PDT

Replacement batteries is a factor when considering keeping the car over 10 years and/or resale value. This EV model costs $20,000 more,over twice than the motor version. If your looking to save money look elsewhere.

chidrbmt
8th June, 2012 @ 10:44 am PDT

This car uses Toshiba SCiB batteries which will last longer than the rest of the car. Probably good value if you're willing to keep the car for a long time.

Alan Parker
9th June, 2012 @ 03:56 am PDT

Great car but they have to keep working on the price. It's hard but I have to wait.

The Hoff
10th June, 2012 @ 01:15 pm PDT

"$389 per month for three years, and the MSRP comes in at $37,415."

If you can lease for $389 / month, why would any one buy one at that price?

bravo88
10th June, 2012 @ 04:37 pm PDT

@chidrbmt: Your comment has no meaning without a frame of reference.

If you are one of those commuters who "drive" the "average" US commute of 10 miles then you comment might be valid. I put drive in quotes as operating a motor vehicle for just a brief period can hardly be called driving.

In my context this vehicle might be a valid choice due to my circumstances. I drive 65 miles each way five days a week at 30 miles per gallon. That means I burn 1200+ gallons of gasoline a year just to get to work. If I had a charging station near work this could save me $3000+ per year or $30,000 in a ten year span. If the battery lasted only the minimum ten years then I'd have still saved money over the life of the car. However the batteries tend to last longer than rated so I could probably squeeze another 5 years out of it raising my overall savings to $45,000 prior to replacing the battery.

To further illustrate my point. I did the math on owning an EV as compared to owning my current Sentra. I keep a logbook in my car of all expenditures related to the vehicle so I can see when it needs a little work. It has cost me about $0.10 per mile counting fuel, oil, coolant, tires, brake pads, and repairs. Taking into account electricity prices in my area; owning an EV that needs no oil, coolant, few brake pads, etc. It would cost me about $0.015 per mile to operate. So I would save $0.085 per mile. Multiply that by the 34000 miles I drive annually, just for work, and you get $2873 time 15 years and you get $43000 in savings. These numbers will only become more favorable as fuel prices spiral out of control.

VirtualGathis
11th June, 2012 @ 08:01 am PDT

Economy cars cost less then $20K...why would I spend $37K to save $1000 dollars a year in gas?? The numbers for hybrid and electric vehicles just dont work.

JBar
11th July, 2012 @ 09:24 am PDT
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