Introducing the Gizmag Store

Health and Wellbeing

Jake Merrell field-testing his Xonano smart foam

As any coach or sports medicine expert will tell you, when an athlete receives a blow to the head, their saying that they feel OK doesn't mean that they don't have a concussion. Particularly in sports like football, it's important to have an objective method of measuring just how much of a hit a player's noggin has taken. While some people have developed impact sensors that can be attached to players' helmets, a student at Utah's Brigham Young University has devised something less obtrusive – impact-sensing helmet-lining foam.  Read More

The scene at Ontario's Rod and Gun Club, where Garrison Bespoke's new bulletproof three-pi...

In a scene only dreamt of by most people, the employees of Garrison Bespoke, an upscale Toronto tailor, lined up and waited their turn to stab their boss, Michael Nguyen, with a hunting knife. Mr. Nguyen emerged from the experience unscathed, thanks to a remarkable bulletproof business suit that has just been revealed to the public.  Read More

According to researchers, a multi-photon laser technique can be used to detect protein agg...

It is generally believed that aggregations of proteins are responsible for brain disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the difficulty has been in detecting the aggregates responsible and removing them from the brain. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden and Polish Wroclaw University of Technology have found a potential solution using lasers.  Read More

The 5aver combines LED lantern and triple-filter mask

The thought of getting caught in a building fire is terrifying. Flames raging, smoke obscuring your vision and making it difficult to breathe, infrastructure crumbling, and you're trying desperately to remain calm and get out. The 5aver won't douse the flames, but the grab-and-go combination of lantern, alarm and mask is designed to help you find your way to safety in a hurry.  Read More

Researchers have created new human hairs using dermal papilla cells found inside the base ...

Current hair transplantation techniques essentially rob Peter to pay Paul, redistributing hair, usually from the back of the head, to the balding area. However, according to Angela M. Christiano from Columbia University Medical Center, about 90 percent of women with hair loss are not strong candidates for hair transplantation surgery because of insufficient donor hair. A new technique developed by Dr Christiano and colleagues that generates new human hair growth from a patient's own cells could make transplantation feasible for such women, as well as men in the early stages of baldness.  Read More

The Eyes-Free Yoga software relies on the Kinect's skeletal tracking capabilities to provi...

Conventional yoga classes with an instructor up front demonstrating positions to the class aren't generally a viable option for the visually impaired, but a team of computer scientists from the University of Washington (UW) is set to open this healthy activity up to such users with the help of a Microsoft's Kinect.  Read More

The Nanostim pacemaker, with a Euro coin for scale

Ordinarily, a pacemaker is surgically implanted below the collarbone, where it sits in a sizable pocket under the skin. Electrical leads run from it to the heart, allowing it to monitor the rhythm of the heartbeat, and deliver electrical pulses to adjust that rhythm as needed. Now, however, Minnesota-based St. Jude Medical has announced upcoming availability of "the world’s first and only commercially available leadless pacemaker." Known as the Nanostim, it's reportedly less than 10 percent the size of a regular pacemaker, and is inserted directly into the heart via a minimally-invasive procedure.  Read More

Prof. Mo Rastgaar (left) and PhD student Evandro Ficanha, with the leg and its testing rig...

Although computer-controlled artificial legs have been around for a few years now, they generally still feature an ankle joint that only allows the foot to tilt along a toe-up/toe-down axis. That's fine for walking in a straight line, but what happens when users want to turn a corner, or walk over uneven terrain? Well, in some cases, they end up falling down. That's why researchers at Michigan Technological University are now developing a microprocessor-controlled leg with an ankle that also lets the foot roll from side to side.  Read More

The Mollii garment helps keep muscle spasms and tension under control

The painful and crippling muscle spasms caused by brain injuries or neurological disorders are typically controlled using medication or even surgery. Soon, however, it may be possible for sufferers to get their muscles under control just by wearing what looks like a high-tech union suit. Known as the Mollii garment, it reportedly produces no side effects, and doesn't have to be worn all the time.  Read More

A sensor worn by dogs may assist in monitoring the seniors who own them (Photo: Shuttersto...

In an age when an increasing number of seniors live by themselves, dogs often provide strong emotional support to those people. Such a strong bond could also be useful for monitoring both the dog’s and its owner’s well-being, according to new research conducted by scientists at Newcastle University. They've developed a sensor to monitor the dog’s movements at home and out of the house.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 26,456 articles