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Health and Wellbeing


— Health and Wellbeing

Kinect hacked to allow Parkinson's sufferers to walk the line

By - May 6, 2015 1 Picture

Most will be familiar with the telltale shaking of Parkinson's disease, but that isn't the only symptom sufferers must endure. They must also contend with what is known as Freezing of Gait (FOG), where the sufferer's muscles can freeze mid-stride, making them feel like their feet are glued to the ground or resulting in them falling over. Researchers at Brunel University London have hacked a Kinect sensor to overcome this.

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— Health and Wellbeing

Zami smart stool senses unhealthy sitting habits

By - May 6, 2015 6 Pictures

The barrage of standing desks to pop up in the last year offers an insight into how parking our backsides all day can affect our health. But perhaps a little attention to our choice of seating could be of benefit too. Dutch startup Zami Life has developed a sensor-equipped, and frankly, not all that comfortable looking stool claimed to encourage active sitting and better posture.

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— Health and Wellbeing

Shadow Wi-Fi fights skin cancer by keeping sun worshippers in the dark

By - May 4, 2015 1 Picture

Awareness campaigns, sunscreen and mending the hole in the ozone layer have all played a part in the battle against skin cancer. But the beachgoers of Peru now have another form of relief from the sun's harmful UV rays. Aimed at drawing in roasting folk who could do with some respite, ad agency Happiness Anywhere has installed towering sun shades and a free Wi-Fi network that only functions when the users are in the shadows.

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— Health and Wellbeing

Existing skin medications may reverse effects of multiple sclerosis

By - April 23, 2015 1 Picture
It's a frustrating situation. There are already stem cells in the nervous system that are capable of repairing the damage done by multiple sclerosis, but getting them to do so has proven very difficult. Now, however, a multi-institutional team led by Case Western Reserve University's Prof. Paul Tesar may have found the answer – and it involves using medications that were designed to treat athlete's foot and eczema. Read More
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