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Health and Wellbeing

Varidesk Pro Plus - halfway up

Sitting down all day is bad for you. Standing up all day is bad for you. We do so many standing desk stories here at Gizmag that we've become acutely aware of our unhealthy desking habits – and just how expensive a lot of sit/stand desks tend to be. So when we ran across the Varidesk Pro Plus, which sells for US$350, fits two monitors and goes up and down with spring-loaded ease, we picked up half a dozen. Here's how they're going.  Read More

The Embrace is designed to spot the warning signs of an epileptic seizure and be comfortab...

The Embrace is the first medical-quality smartwatch that helps predict epileptic seizures, and measure stress, activity and sleep. Designed to improve the lives of people with epilepsy, the sleek-looking device can also be worn purely as a stylish watch.  Read More

The MisterBrightLight standing desk prompts users to get to their feet when they've been s...

We've kept a pretty keen eye on the standing desk movement here at Gizmag. After all, us writers can spend fair chunks of time on our backsides. The team behind MisterBrightLight is the latest to take a stand on the stubborn nature of standard office furniture, launching a smart desk whose height can be adjusted by hand gestures when you've been seated for too long.  Read More

The Goodwell toothbrush is designed as a more eco-friendly way to brush your teeth

If we assume everybody is acting on the advice of their dentist and replacing their toothbrush every few months, then there's likely a lot of frayed bristles laying in landfill right now. But must our dental care devices take on such as short lifespan? The Goodwell open-source toothbrush is a modern take on oral hygiene, built from eco-friendly materials and made to last until you haven't got any teeth left to brush.  Read More

The cat and mouse Pac-Man-style game found to help treat lazy eye

With video games having previously been found to improve decision making speeds and the brain's capacity to learn, scientists have now created challenging computer games with a fun element that significantly improved depth perception and binocular vision in people with a lazy eye. Unlike the traditional patch used to treat the condition, the video games encourage both eyes to work together.  Read More

An Ebola vaccine delivered through the nose and into the airways could help reduce the spr...

Scientists have produced a single dose Ebola vaccine shown to provide primates with long-term protection from the deadly disease. What is most promising about the development is the delivery method, with the vaccine administered through the nose and lungs, mitigating the associated risk of spreading the disease through infected needles.  Read More

Youbionic says its hands will cost around €1,000, a fraction of the price of current comme...

Italian start-up Youbionic has created a functional, myoelectric bionic hand using 3D printing and Arduino components. While still at prototype stage, the company says that its research will result in a prosthetic hand that costs a tenth or less than other models on the market.  Read More

Sesame aims to provide smartphone access to users with disabilities that prevent them from...

Sesame is a system designed specifically for users with only limited or no use of their hands. The device pairs head tracking software with some familiar hardware with the goal of bringing smartphone functionality to those who would otherwise be unable to make use of it.  Read More

A flower petal treated with WetForce-enabled sunscreen, before and after exposure to water...

Most people generally think of water and sweat as being things that hinder the effectiveness of sunscreen – even in cases where it's billed as being waterproof. According to Shiseido, however, its newly-developed WetForce technology not only keeps water from compromising sunscreen, but actually uses it to help block UV rays.  Read More

The prototype implant, with its near-infrared LED

Wouldn't it be great if there were implants that detected the brainwaves associated with conditions such as chronic headaches or epilepsy, and then responded by triggering genes in the patient's body to produce a protein that treated the condition? Well, scientists at the ETH Zurich research institute are on their way to making it happen. They've developed an implant that causes genetically-modified cells to express a specific protein, and the device is indeed activated by brain waves.  Read More

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