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Health and Wellbeing

If the amount of crowdfunding being thrown at standing desks is anything to go by, it won't be long before the office chair goes the way of the typewriter. Ok, that might be a slight exaggeration, but they are certainly gaining in popularity due to the apparent health benefits of not spending all day on our butts. The latest standing desk to tower over its Kickstarter goal within days of launching is Lift, a stylish wooden unit designed to improve posture and productivity. Read More
A new system developed by the Toumaz Group may hold the key to improving the level of life-saving attention received by patients, providing two-minute updates on their vital signs 24 hours a day with the use of a comfortable, wireless sensor pad. The equipment, known as SensiumVitals, is claimed to be so portable and convenient that it could even be used in the future to provide hospital-level observation to individuals in the comfort of their own homes. Read More
While there are a wide range of scenarios that may cause a person to take their own life, the fact is that in a given situation, some people will do so whereas others won't. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine now believe that this difference can largely be traced to a genetic mutation in the people who are more likely to commit suicide. What's more, this mutation can be detected via a blood test. Read More
For workers who are sat at a desk all day, health and fitness can be a concern. There are various solutions for desk-based workouts, such as the OfficeGym chair attachment and Active Desk workspace/exercise bike. The Cubii, meanwhile, is a compact elliptical trainer that fits under your desk. Read More
Date rape drugs are often the substance of choice for perpetrators of sexual assaults, the effects of which leave the victim unable to defend themselves, not able to remember any of the events that ensued and – worse – not able to recall details of their attacker. In an effort to help people avoid such despicable acts, a group of designers has produced a miniature reusable electronic device that they claim will determine if a drink has been spiked. Read More
Over the past few years scientists and researchers have made some inroads in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease, but as yet no definitive cure has been found. In the latest promising development, a team of Canadian researchers has identified a genetic variant that can delay the onset of the disease by up to four years. Read More
Like a lot of us, young people like to party. But being under the influence of alcohol in an unfamiliar environment or in crowds of strangers can reduce their ability to protect themselves or make safe choices, particularly when they become separated from their friends. In an attempt to reduce the danger, a group of University of Washington students have designed a smart wearable that automatically alerts friends if something may be wrong. Read More
For people who are almost entirely unable to walk, a powerful heavy-duty electric wheelchair is sometimes necessary. For folks who simply have limited mobility, however, often all that's needed is a little something to lessen the amount of walking that they have to do. A number of lightweight folding electric wheelchairs have emerged to serve that market. One of the latest, the Zinger, is also reportedly the lightest. Read More
There’s nothing like a good night’s rest to make us feel great during the day. But just how well do we sleep? The science behind sleep monitoring is improving, with several wearable consumer devices that monitor activities including sleep. A new partnership between wearables manufacturer Misfit, which makes the Shine activity tracker, and sleep-monitoring company Beddit, offers a non-wearable alternative for those who want to focus more deeply on their sleep. Read More
Ever since the Fukushima nuclear reactor disaster, there has understandably been an upsurge in the sale of consumer radiation-detecting devices. Most of these gadgets are variations on the Geiger counter, in that they alert the user to the presence and level of radiation, but not the type of radiation – which is very important to know. Researchers at Oregon State University are hoping to address that situation by developing a handheld device that will additionally tell its users what type of radionuclide is creating the radiation, and whether it poses a risk. Read More
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