Shopping? Check out our latest product comparisons

Health and Wellbeing

With the new Blizzident toothbrush (if it can be called a toothbrush), a full and complete...

When it comes to things that people don't do as often or as well as they should, tooth-brushing would have to be at the top of the list. While it usually just comes down to laziness, a lot of people claim that they don't brush their teeth properly because they don't have time. Well, with the new Blizzident toothbrush (if it can be called a toothbrush), a full and complete cleaning of the teeth can reportedly be accomplished in just six seconds.  Read More

The tenofovir disoproxil fumarate intravaginal ring – or TDF-IVR, for short

According to UNAIDS, a member of the United Nations Development Group, 58 percent of people living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa are women. Although preventative drugs and condoms do block the transmission of HIV, neither are always practical, available or affordable in developing nations. Help could be on its way, however, in the form of an anti-HIV intravaginal ring that is worn continuously for up to 30 days.  Read More

BluFit monitors water intake and sends alerts

Staying properly hydrated has become easier with a new high-tech, connected water bottle. BluFit updates the traditional water bottle to the digital age with the promise of an optimal hydration experience, including the possibility of customizing it to specific requirements.  Read More

iPhones can now be used to obtain high-quality images of the retina  (Photo: Shutterstock)...

Given that iPhones can already be used to perform skin exams, perhaps it shouldn't come as a surprise that they're now able to do eye exams, too. Researchers from Harvard Medical School's Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary have devised a way of using the phones to perform fundus photography, which is the photographing of the retina. While the iPhone just requires an app and a lens to perform the task, a complete fundus camera can cost tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Read More

Rice University researchers use the heartbeat as a random signal generator to make medical...

Remotely hacking a pacemaker or insulin pump should be impossible, but sadly it isn't. It puts the millions of people who use wireless medical implants at potential risk. Researchers at Rice University believe they have a solution: a touch-based device that will use a person's own heartbeat as a password to permit or deny access to their implant.  Read More

Using a built-in processor and motorized legs, the Stir Kinetic Desk can quietly adjust it...

By now, the negative effects of sitting at a desk for hours each day have been thoroughly documented, and nearly every office has its prominent figures who swear that standing keeps them alert and attentive while they're working. It seems as if most people would benefit from a taller desk, but many are reluctant to make such a drastic switch. That's why Stir, Inc. is offering a high-tech middleground with its upcoming Kinetic Desk. Using a built-in processor and motorized legs, the Stir Kinetic Desk can quietly adjust its own height throughout the day to help people stay focused and even burn a few extra calories in the process.  Read More

One of the Tel Aviv coiled heart tissue fibers

When a heart attack occurs, the resulting dead heart tissue is replaced with scar tissue that's incapable of expanding and contracting. This means that the victim is left with a permanently weakened heart. Numerous studies are now looking at ways in which the dead tissue can instead be replaced with functioning cardiac tissue. While most of the lab-grown tissue created so far has used straight fibers as a base, scientists at Tel Aviv University recently had another idea – if the tissue is supposed to expand and contract, then why not make it using springy fibers?  Read More

New research has provided 'strong hope' of finding a drug to combat Alzheimer’s (Image: Sh...

A team of researchers at Yale University has completed a molecular model for Alzheimer's disease by identifying a protein that plays a key role in its onset. Promisingly, the study showed that when the activity of this protein is blocked by an existing drug, mice engineered as models for human AD recover their memories.  Read More

'With some longer term, moonshot thinking around healthcare and biotechnology, I believe w...

Never one to shy away from big challenges, Google has announced the formation of a new company aimed at tackling major health and wellbeing issues with a "particular focus on aging and associated diseases."  Read More

Scientists at the Oregon Health and Science University have announced a positive step towa...

A very promising vaccine candidate for HIV/AIDS has shown the ability to completely clear the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a very aggressive form of HIV that leads to AIDS in monkeys. Developed at the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), the vaccine proved successful in about fifty percent of the subjects tested and could lead to a human vaccine preventing the onset of HIV/AIDS and even cure patients currently on anti-retroviral drugs.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 27,874 articles