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Health and Wellbeing


— Health and Wellbeing

Electronic glove ensures CPR is being done correctly

May 21, 2007 Only 6 months after learning life-saving CPR techniques, around 60 percent of first aiders - including doctors and nurses - forget how to do it correctly. As a result, survival rates from cardiac arrests remain low. The Canadian CPR Glove acts as a quick on-the-job refresher course, making sure the first aider administers the correct frequency and depth of chest compression. It's a simple and cheap device that has real potential to save lives if included in a first aid kit. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Tiny, portable biosensor to be a big gun in the fight against food contamination

May 18, 2007 As more and more chemical assistance becomes available to farmers, it becomes more and more important to be able to accurately measure if these chemicals make it through into our food and drink. And while pesticides and herbicides can have an immediate or accumulative harmful effect on our bodies, the accidental ingestion of small amounts of antibiotics through animal meat can contribute to the strengthening of bacterial resistance to antibiotics - a potentially more serious side-effect. Testing for contaminants has typically been slow, expensive and limited by laboratory location - but this tiny, portable and cheap biosensor developed in Spain makes it much quicker and easier to test a range of agricultural products on the spot. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

micro-MIM - micro metal powder injection molding

May 9, 2007 Modern advanced production techniques are fast moving into the realms of the fantastic. We've regularly marveled at some of the modern advanced production techniques such a 3D printing and now there's a new one - micro metal powder injection molding (micro-MIM). Until now, the production of tiny metal parts using techniques such as etching or milling has been a very complex and time-consuming process, and not suitable for many types of metal. It has been possible for a long time to produce very small parts from stainless steel, but with micro-MIM, it is now possible to combine and shape different types of material such as this (pictured) biocompatible titanium stirrup, a replacement for the small bone in the human ear. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Bluetooth health monitoring lets you upload your vital stats to your doctor from home

May 9, 2007 Turning the health-care model upside down, a small Australian company is working on bluetooth technology that logs and transmits medical observation data to a central network through a mobile phone - so your doctor can call YOU when a problem is developing. Alive's bluetooth technology is already proving useful in the recovery of cardiac outpatients and the diagnosis of sleep apnea - and a range of products in development aim to make advancements in health monitoring for diabetics, mountaineers and athletes in training. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Cooling glove invigorates overheated athletes - and also delivers training performance gains

May 9, 2007 While traditional body cooling systems such as ice vests, wet towels and misting fans may feel like they're working to the benefit of the user, they're actually quite ineffective at reducing the body's core temperature, as they work against the body's natural insulation and heat retention systems. Through extensive research into mammalian heat regulation systems, AVAcore has developed a simple, portable device that effects heat exchange to the body core extremely quickly. You don't necessarily feel cooler, you just feel completely refreshed and less fatigued - and the system is producing some remarkable and unexpected results for athletes. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

3-D ultrasound from 2-D scanners for less than US$1000

May 7, 2007 Almost every doctor’s surgery in a developed country has a 2-D ultrasound scanner and for most parents it’s the first time they see their child-to-be. Apart from enabling us to see an unborn child in its mother’s womb, medical ultrasonography helps to detect gall stones, identify tumor-like lumps and it plays a particularly important role in the early detection of breast cancer. Three-dimensional sonography can provide especially informative images, for instance allowing the structure of tumors, their growth pattern and their blood supply to be clearly distinguished from healthy tissue. Although 3-D technology has been available since the 1990s, it remains prohibitively expensive. Physicians and clinics wishing to upgrade from 2-D to 3-D technology usually have to invest more than US$100,000 in new equipment. Now researchers have produced a system that enables conventional 2-D ultrasound scanners to be upgraded to provide 3-D images for less than US$1000. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

New table saw can tell the difference between wood and hands

May 7, 2007 Table saws are involved in more than 60,000 accidents every year in the United States alone - an accident every nine minutes, costing US$2 billion before you consider the pain and disruption. Now a small Oregon company is changing woodworking professionals’ jobs with a table saw that only cuts wood – not fingers. The company has invented a table saw that immediately retracts the blade when it touches a finger, making woodworking safer and eliminating painful and very costly medical procedures. When the blade touches a finger (or something else that conducts electrical current), the current drops and engages a brake. As the blade’s teeth sink into the brake, the momentum forces the blade to drop below the table. The entire process takes only three milliseconds, which is a fraction of the time it takes to blink your eye. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

The Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor

April 16, 2007 Taking one’s blood pressure can clearly tell you a lot about your health, but not nearly as much as SunTech Medical’s Oscar 2 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitor (ABP) monitor. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring provides a comprehensive assessment of a patient’s blood pressure profile with BP variability, overnight dipping and morning surge that in-clinic and home BP monitoring cannot provide. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Precise and low-cost submicron fabrication technique for manufacturing human spare parts

April 12, 2007 VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tampere University of Technology and Nanofoot Finland Oy have developed a direct-write three-dimensional forming method of biomaterials. The methodology enables fabrication of nano and micrometer scale structures that can be used as parts of tissue engineering scaffolds. The project is funded by the BioneXt Tampere Research Programme. Read More
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