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Workout at the office with the GymyGym exercise chair

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December 10, 2010

The GymyGym ergonomic exercise chair places a full body workout at your disposal without e...

The GymyGym ergonomic exercise chair places a full body workout at your disposal without ever having to leave your desk

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A relatively recent shift from manual labor to office-type work has resulted in a large chunk of today's workforce spending eight hours or more sitting at a desk or workstation. The general health and fitness of a significant proportion of such a workforce is bound to suffer as a result. Anyone wanting to fight against this decline can of course opt for gym membership, but Adam Ben-David thinks he has a better solution. The GymyGym ergonomic exercise chair places a full body workout at your disposal without ever having to leave your desk.

Ben-David believes that a deskbound public is overworked, overstressed and overweight, and says that he wants to "support the American worker in transforming their lives by increasing their physical and mental health, self-image, fitness and creativity," adding that "GymyGym delivers a customizable, full-spectrum fitness solution within a powerful seating system."

The benefits of a healthy exercise regime are well-documented, yet even a short 30 minute burst of physical activity per day is beyond the reach of some people. That's where the GymyGym comes in. It's claimed to be the world's first ergonomic exercise chair, and is said to offer a full-body strengthening and conditioning fitness system.

The leg muscles get a workout too, with straps from the bottom of the chair connected to r...

The user sits back on a stripped bungee seating system that's said to mold itself to the shape and size of the individual for a comfortably ergonomic fit. Various handles and straps are located below the odd-looking chair, which allow the user to undertake 16 core exercises aimed at strengthening all of the major muscle groups.

The hand grips are attached to the body of the chair by magnets for safe storage when not in use. They, and the leg straps, are secured to a system of natural silicone resistance bands threaded through the underneath of – and up behind - the seat, to four exercise stations. Pulling against the resistance allows the seated (or even standing) worker to work on arms, legs, chest, back and shoulders and so on.

When a user stands up from the chair, a locking mechanism activates in the wheels to allow for stable standing exercises, and releases again once the user sits back in the chair.

"The chair itself is very stable, and supports weight up and above 300 pounds comfortably," Ben-David told Gizmag. "The support is a combination of the strength of the flay bungee's and the way weight is supported when the chair is reclining. Weight is kept supported over the middle line of the chair, so it still very stable even when reclined."

The GymyGym has been in production for a few years now and has, according to Ben-David, "gone through many iterations of the exercise patents" but certain aspects have remained throughout its development, such as the flat bungee seating area. It's manufactured using 95 percent recycled materials, including the steel, bungee cord and paint.

The company has had a presence in the U.S. for about a year, but is now going full steam ahead into the American marketplace. The GymyGym comes in three color versions – all-black, orange on black or red on black, and is priced at US$599. It's perhaps a rather expensive option for the home worker but comparable to many quality ergonomic chairs available to businesses, and it may save the cost of gym membership.

Working the biceps with the help of the arm rest

While keeping the various muscle groups in good working order is vital for health, the company makes no claims to cure medical conditions and recommends that users consult a physician prior to using the chair.

Just how you're supposed to make time for all this stretching and pulling with a phone in one hand and the other frantically typing at a keyboard is another matter. I also wonder how many people would really want to work in an office atmosphere filled with the heady perfume of armpit odor from fellow workers. Does your office have shower facilities?

The product site features many instructional videos showing the chair in action, like this one:

About the Author
Paul Ridden While Paul is loath to reveal his age, he will admit to cutting his IT teeth on a TRS-80 (although he won't say which version). An obsessive fascination with computer technology blossomed from hobby into career before the desire for sunnier climes saw him wave a fond farewell to his native Blighty in favor of Bordeaux, France. He's now a dedicated newshound pursuing the latest bleeding edge tech for Gizmag.   All articles by Paul Ridden
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2 Comments

LOL.....

Michael Mantion
10th December, 2010 @ 04:18 pm PST

Reminds me of the torture chamber scene in "Brazil".

Facebook User
22nd December, 2010 @ 05:09 pm PST
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