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Good Thinking

— Good Thinking

2014 James Dyson Award international winners announced

By - November 6, 2014 5 Pictures
James Roberts, a 23 year-old design grad from Britain's Loughborough University, has won this year's international James Dyson Award for his portable inflatable incubator. Called MOM, the device is intended to be a low-cost alternative to traditional incubators, allowing premature babies in places such as refugee camps to survive when they might otherwise perish. Read on for more details on it, along with the three runners-up. Read More
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Barsha pump provides irrigation water, but doesn't need fuel

By - November 4, 2014 2 Pictures
Climate-KIC, a European-union climate innovation initiative, recently selected a jury of entrepreneurs, financiers and business people to award funding to what they felt were Europe’s best clean-tech innovations of 2014. Taking first place was Dutch startup aQysta, a Delft University of Technology spin-off company that manufactures what's known as the Barsha irrigation pump. It can reportedly boost crop yields in developing nations by up to five times, yet requires no fuel or electricity to operate. Read More

TrakBelt360 puts a new spin on tool belts

If you're perched on a ladder or are dangling in a harness, then twisting around to grab something from the back of your tool belt can be rather challenging. That's why New York firefighter/photographer Chris Landano created the TrakBelt360. It's a tool belt that lets you rotate pouches or tool holsters all the way around it, so that the item you need ends up right at the front. Read More
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[NSFW] The Handie simulates a quiet night alone for Tony Stark

By - October 28, 2014 12 Pictures
Some machines are so perfect, so ingenious and so fit for their purpose that they endure, unchanged, for centuries. Millennia, even. The wheel. The bucket. The knife. The human hand. The hand is one of the crowning evolutionary achievements of our species. Its opposable thumb makes it an incredibly versatile tool, capable of grasping and manipulating complex objects. It’s also super grouse to grab and tug your genitals with, in a manner familiar to teenagers, Gizmag writers and lower primates alike. But that doesn't mean it can't be improved upon. Meet the Handie. Read More
— Good Thinking

Fire Blanket uses spaceship tech to protect forest-firefighters

By - October 27, 2014 1 Picture
Last June, a wildfire near Yarnell, Arizona overtook and killed 19 firefighters – even though they had set up fireproof shelters. This inspired Phoenix-based SunSeeker Enterprises to develop a shelter that's better able to withstand the high heat of forest fires. Utilizing a material licensed from NASA to protect the Space Shuttle on re-entry, the Fire Blanket is the result. Read More
— Good Thinking

RiutBag helps keep thieving hands away from backpack belongings

By - October 27, 2014 4 Pictures
Traveling to work in the city on a crowded train or bus has become a necessary part of the daily grind for many urbanites, and the backpack is often the weapon of choice for the transport of commute necessities. But Sarah Giblin spotted a design flaw in this useful storage solution and set out to do something about it. The problem is that unless you take it off or wear it to the front when enjoying the rush hour squeeze, all of those exposed compartment zips are just asking for probing fingers to dip in and remove the contents. Giblin's answer is the RiutBag, which has no zips on the outer shell. Read More
— Good Thinking

Wireless Yardarm Sensor monitors firearm use in real time

By - October 26, 2014 7 Pictures
Anytime a police officer draws their weapon, it's likely to be a tense, confusing situation where split second decisions can be the difference between life and death. In an attempt to reduce some of the confusion, Yardarm has developed a wireless sensor that allows firearms to be tracked and monitored in real time thanks to a small electronics package that fits into the weapon's grip. Read More
— Good Thinking

Ear-IT project: How listening to the sounds of a city could make for smarter living

By - October 23, 2014 1 Picture
As the Internet of Things starts to take hold, we're seeing the emergence of gadgets equipped with all kinds of sensors to improve the world around us, from energy-saving climate control systems to smart locks for the front door. But have you ever thought about how sound might be measured and used to bring another level of automation? For the last two years, the Ear-IT project has been monitoring acoustics in the Spanish city of Santander, and says the results could improve the lives of its residents in ways ranging from improved traffic flow to energy savings in the home. Read More

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