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New Singer prints embroidery patterns straight from PC to fabric

By

July 25, 2007

Singer's Futura CE250 sewing and embroidery machine

Singer's Futura CE250 sewing and embroidery machine

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July 26, 2007 The Singer company has a spectacular and storied history of firsts. Founded in 1851, the iconic company produced the world’s first portable sewing machine in 1921, and built and then demolished the world’s first and tallest skyscraper on the site of New York’s World Trade Center as its head office. Singer was one of America’s first truly globally marketed brands with an unprecedented advertising budget, and the company made the first computer-controlled sewing machine in 1978. Now, Singer has built on its impressive past by creating a sewing and embroidery machine that allows you to design a multi-coloured embroidery pattern on a PC, and “print” it directly to the fabric through a USB connection. The new Singer Futura machine is designed to make complex and beautiful embroidery a simple, quick and controllable task for any home craftsperson, and brings the old-world craft into a distinctly new-age technology.

Today SVP Worldwide, owner of Singer brand sewing machines, recently announced the global release of its new Singer Futura range of sewing and embroidery machines that connect to a PC through a USB port to give fullscreen, full colour access to designs before they go to the fabric.

“Over half of all sewers who do not currently embroider are interested in learning how,” said Don Fletcher, CEO of SVP Worldwide. “And those who attempt to embroider typically encounter the challenges of the complexity of the craft and expensive equipment. The new Singer Futura machines are easy to use and very affordable. Whether you are a beginning embroiderer who wants the ability to create trendy looks and personalized items or an avid sewer longing for an embroidery machine, the new Futura line is for everyone.”

With the Singer Futura machine, the embroiderer prepares everything on their PC and simply sends the complete design, with all colors, through the USB Port directly into the Futura machine, ready for stitching. Sewers can view their designs in full color on their PC versus an LCD screen built into the sewing machine. The USB connectivity makes transferring the design effortless without scrolling through menus or files.

The embroidering possibilities are endless using the SINGER FUTURA machines. In addition to the 120 built-in embroidery designs, the new product line can receive, adapt and embroider designs from other manufacturers as well as thousands of elite embroidery designs available online. Additional software packages are also available for use with the new Futura machine with the following tools that make advanced embroidery techniques easy to accomplish.

* AutoPunch™ – Converts clip art into embroidery * Editing – Personalizes existing designs * HyperFont™ – Converts your PC's TrueType font into embroidery * Auto Cross-Stitch™ – Converts clip art into cross-stitching design * Photo Stitch™ – Converts photos into stitch-filled embroidery designs.

In addition, three StayBright LED™ lights provide an extra bright sewing surface and a new sensor will stop the machine if it detects the thread has broken.

The Futura CE150 is available from around US$599 and the CE250 retails at US$899.

About the Author
Loz Blain Loz has been one of Gizmag's most versatile contributors since 2007. Joining the team as a motorcycle specialist, he has since covered everything from medical and military technology to aeronautics, music gear and historical artefacts. Since 2010 he's branched out into photography, video and audio production, and he remains the only Gizmag contributor willing to put his name to a sex toy review. A singer by night, he's often on the road with his a cappella band Suade.   All articles by Loz Blain
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